2007 FULL MOON DATES, NAMES,
MOON PHASES and SEASONS

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Moon Phases Pic
Full Moon names date back to Native American Indians of the northern and eastern United States. Tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring Full Moon. Their names pertained to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the names, but generally the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed the custom and even created some of their own. A few names are duplicated in subsequent months because of different regional locations of the tribes. A lunar month averages about 29.5 days and the Full Moon dates change from year to year. Click on a month or name listed in the index below to see full names and descriptions.

(Due to different time zones, dates and times may vary. The dates below are based on CST.)
Daylight Savings Time changes for 2007 are April 1st and October 28th.






2007 Dates & Times


 January 3, 2007 @ 7:57am CST 

 February 1, 2007 @ 11:45pm CST 

 March 3, 2007 @ 5:17pm CST 

 April 2, 2007 @ 12:15pm CDT 

 May 2, 2007 @ 5:09am CDT 

 May 31, 2007 @ 8:04pm CDT   Blue Moon 

 June 30, 2007 @ 8:49am CDT 

 July 29, 2007 @ 7:48pm CDT 

 August 28, 2007 @ 5:35am CDT 

 September 26, 2007 @ 2:45pm CDT 

 October 25, 2007 @ 11:51pm CDT 

 November 24, 2007 @ 8:30am CST 

 December 23, 2007 @ 7:15pm CST 

 Names Provided by Matthews 

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 Black Moon 

 Blue Moon 

 Harvest Moon 

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 Vernal Equinox 

 Summer Solstice 

 Autumnal Equinox 

 Winter Solstice 

 What is an Equinox? 

 What is a Solstice? 

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 Moon Phases w/ Pics 

 More on the Moon 

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JANUARY
Old Farmer's AlmanacWolf Moon
Algonquin / ColonialOld Moon
English / MedievalWolf Moon
Neo-PaganIce Moon
CelticStorm Moon
Other NamesCold Moon


WOLF MOON
Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. It was sometimes referred to as the Old Moon or the Moon after Yule. Also called the Snow Moon, but most tribes applied that name to the next Full Moon.
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FEBRUARY
Old Farmer's AlmanacSnow Moon
Algonquin / ColonialHunger Moon
English / MedievalStorm Moon
Neo-PaganSnow Moon
CelticChaste Moon
Other NamesBony Moon
Opening Buds Moon


SNOW MOON
The native tribes of the northern and eastern states most often called this full Moon the Snow Moon because the heaviest snows fall in this month. Also referred to as the Hunger Moon, among some tribes, due to harsh weather conditions that made hunting very difficult.
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MARCH
Old Farmer's AlmanacWorm Moon
Algonquin / ColonialChaste Moon
Crust Moon
English / MedievalDeath Moon
Sap Moon
Neo-PaganCrow Moon
CelticSeed Moon
Other NamesMaple Sugar Moon
Sugar Moon
Windy Moon


WORM MOON
As the temperature becomes warmer and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts reappear along with the return of robins. The northern tribes called this the Crow Moon, with the cawing of crows signaling the end of winter. Also known as the Crust Moon because the snow becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Sap Moon marked the time of tapping maple trees. Settlers also knew this as the Lenten Moon. A biblical name referring to the last full Moon of winter.
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APRIL
Old Farmer's AlmanacPink Moon
Algonquin / ColonialPink Moon
Seed Moon
English / MedievalAwakening Moon
Neo-PaganGrass Moon
CelticHare Moon
Other NamesFish Moon
Flower Moon
Frog Moon
Moon of the Red Grass
Planter's Moon


PINK MOON
This name is from the pink grass/moss or wild ground phlox, one of the earliest widespread of flowers in spring. Other names include Sprouting Grass Moon and Egg Moon. The name Fish Moon came from the coastal tribes because the shad swam upstream to spawn. This is the first Full Moon of spring and it's also known as the Paschal Moon. The feast of Passover begins at sundown on this night and the first Sunday following the first Full Moon of spring is designated as Easter Sunday.
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MAY
Old Farmer's AlmanacFlower Moon
Algonquin / ColonialFlower Moon
English / MedievalGrass Moon
Hare Moon
Neo-PaganPlanting Moon
CelticDyad Moon
Other NamesBudding Moon
Corn Planting Moon
Milk Moon


FLOWER MOON
This months Full Moon is named after the abundant flowers in bloom during this time of year. Also known as the Corn Planting Moon or Milk Moon.
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JUNE
Old Farmer's AlmanacStrawberry Moon
Algonquin / ColonialDyad Moon
Rose Moon
English / MedievalPlanting Moon
Neo-PaganStrawberry Moon
CelticMead Moon
Other NamesGreen Corn Moon
Honey Moon
Hot Moon


STRAWBERRY MOON
This name was widely known to the Algonquin tribe. Also named the Strawberry Moon because of the relatively short season for growing strawberries. In Europe it was called the Rose Moon.
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JULY click here
Old Farmer's AlmanacBuck Moon
Algonquin / ColonialBuck Moon
Mead Moon
English / MedievalRose Moon
Neo-PaganHay Moon
CelticWyrt Moon
Other NamesBlood Moon
Ripe Corn Moon
Thunder Moon


BUCK MOON
This month is usually when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads coated with velvety fur. Also known as the Thunder Moon because of thunderstorms being more prevalent at this time of year. Another name for this Full Moon was the Hay Moon.
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AUGUST
Old Farmer's AlmanacSturgeon Moon
Algonquin / ColonialCorn Moon
Sturgeon Moon
English / MedievalLightening Moon
Neo-PaganGrain Moon
CelticBarley Moon
Other NamesDog Days Moon
Fruit Moon
Green Corn Moon
Red Moon
Wyrt Moon


STURGEON MOON
The fishing tribes of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water like Lake Champlain are responsible for naming this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes, was plentiful during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Red Moon because of the sturgeons reddish appearance as it rose through a sultry haze. Also called the Corn Moon or Grain Moon.
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SEPTEMBER
Old Farmer's AlmanacHarvest Moon
Algonquin / ColonialHarvest Moon
English / MedievalBarley Moon
Neo-PaganHarvest Moon
CelticBlood Moon
Other NamesCorn Moon
Fruit Moon
Nut Moon


HARVEST MOON
Traditionally, this name is for the Full Moon that occurs closest to the Autumn (Fall) Equinox. In two out of three years the Harvest Moon comes in September, but every third year it occurs in October. At the peak of the harvest, farmers can work into the night by the light of this Moon. A definite plus for the farmer. Fruit Moon or Barley Moon are names reserved for those years when the Harvest Moon appears very late in September or in early October.
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OCTOBER
Old Farmer's AlmanacHunter's Moon
Algonquin / ColonialHunter's Moon
English / MedievalBlood Moon
Neo-PaganBlood Moon
CelticSnow Moon
Other NamesDying Grass Moon
Falling Leaves Moon
Travel Moon


HUNTER'S MOON
With the leaves falling and the deer fattened, hunting season has arrived. The fields have been reaped and hunters can more easily see the game that have come out to glean.
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NOVEMBER
Old Farmer's AlmanacBeaver Moon
Algonquin / ColonialBeaver Moon
English / MedievalSnow Moon
Neo-PaganTree Moon
CelticOak Moon
Other NamesFrost Moon
Frosty Moon
Trading Moon


BEAVER MOON
This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Also known as the Beaver Moon because beavers are now active in their preparation for winter. Sometimes this full Moon is referred to as the Frosty Moon.
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DECEMBER
Old Farmer's AlmanacCold Moon
Algonquin / ColonialCold Moon
Oak Moon
English / MedievalLong Night Moon
Neo-PaganMoon before Yule
CelticWolf Moon


COLD MOON
Also known as the Long Nights Moon among some tribes. During this month the winter cold is gripping and nights are at their longest and darkest. It is sometimes called the Moon before Yule. (the full moon before Christmas) The name Long Night Moon is doubly appropriate because the midwinter nights are indeed long and the Moon is above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter Full Moon has a high trajectory across the sky because it's directly opposite to the low Sun.
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Names Provided by Matthews
Season Name
1st WinterMoon after Yule
2nd WinterWolf Moon
Last WinterLenten Moon
1st SpringEaster Moon
Egg Moon
Paschal Moon
2nd SpringMilk Moon
Last SpringFlower Moon
1st SummerHay Moon
2nd SummerGrain Moon
Last SummerFruit Moon
1st AutumnHarvest Moon
2nd AutumnHunter's Moon
Last AutumnMoon before Yule


BLUE MOON
Insert a Blue Moon in any season as required,
after the 2nd moon and before the last.
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BLACK MOON

A Black Moon occurs when there are New Moons in any given calendar month, also known as Dark Cycles of the Moon. It is believed that the second New Moon has great spiritual powers. The next Black Moon will be 8-30-2008 @ 2:58pm CDT.
(Due to different time zones, dates and times may vary.)
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BLUE MOON

When 2 Full Moons appear in the same month, the second moon is often referred to as a Blue Moon. Each season contains at least 3 Full Moons. These Moons are known as the 1st, 2nd and Last Full Moon and each bear a distinctive name. Since a lunar month averages about 29.5 days, there will occasionally be seasons with 4 Full Moons. This additional Moon is a true "Blue Moon" and it appears between the 2nd and Last Moon of that season. A Blue Moon appears, on average, every 2.7 years.

Universal Time (GMT) - The 1st full moon in June is 6-1-07 @ 1:04am, a Blue Moon appears on 6-30-07 @ 1:48pm.
(Due to different time zones, dates and times may vary.)

[pic] For more information on Blue Moons Click Here or Click Here.

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HARVEST MOON

The Harvest Moon is always the Full Moon closest to the Autumn Equinox. If the Harvest Moon occurs in October, the September Full Moon is usually called the Corn Moon. The names Barley Moon and Fruit Moon are reserved only for those years when the Harvest Moon appears very late in September or in early October. The Autumn Equinox for 2007 is September 23rd @ 4:51am CDT making the Harvest Moon for 2007 September 26th @ 2:45pm CDT.
(Due to different time zones, dates and times may vary.)
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SPRING EQUINOX or VERNAL EQUINOX
March 20, 2007 @ 7:07pm CST


Most of us recognize this date as the beginning of Spring. As well as signifying changing seasons, March 20 (March 21 in some years), the Sun crosses directly over the Earth's equator, from south to north. This moment is known as the Vernal Equinox in the Northern Hemisphere. People south of the Equator get ready for the cooler temperatures of Autumnal Equinox.

The Vernal Equinox has been recognized for thousands of years. Along with the coming of Spring, the date is also significant in Christianity. Easter falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon that occurs after the Vernal Equinox. (Due to different time zones, dates and times may vary.)
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SUMMER SOLSTICE
June 21, 2007 @ 1:06pm CDT


This is when we experience the longest day of the year. People in the Northern or Southern Hemispheres experience the same phenomenon. For several days before and after each solstice, the sun appears to stand still in the sky. More specifically the noontime elevation does not seem to change. Solstice comes from the Latin meaning sun stands still. It signifies the beginning of Summer north of the Equator. Those south of the Equator will begin their Winter season. The Sun's position reaches its greatest distance above the equator, about 23 1/2 of arc. During the Summer Solstice, the sun is directly overhead at noon and over the Tropic of Cancer. (Due to different time zones, dates and times may vary.)
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FALL EQUINOX or AUTUMNAL EQUINOX
September 23, 2007 @ 4:51am CDT


A second equinox occurs each year on September 22 or 23 as the Sun crosses directly over the Earth's equator, from north to south. It marks the beginning of Fall. It's known as the Autumnal Equinox in the Northern Hemisphere. At the same moment the Southern Hemisphere is entering into Spring, or the Vernal Equinox. (Due to different time zones, dates and times may vary.)
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WINTER SOLSTICE
December 22, 2007 @ 12:08am CST


A second Solstice occurs each year at noon on December 21 or 22. The Winter Solstice marks the shortest day and the longest night of the year. The the sun is directly overhead at noon and shines over the Tropic of Capricorn, below the Equator. This Solstice marks the beginning of Winter in the Northern Hemisphere and Summer in the Southern Hemisphere. For several days before and after each solstice, the sun appears to stand still in the sky in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. More specifically the noontime elevation does not seem to change. The Sun's position reaches its greatest distance below the equator, about 23 1/2 of arc. Solstice comes from the Latin meaning sun stands still. (Due to different time zones, dates and times may vary.)
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WHAT IS AN EQUINOX?

The word Equinox means "Equal Night". Because the sun is positioned above the Equator, day and night are about equal in length all over the world during both Equinoxes. These brief but monumental moments are due to the 23.4 degree tilt of the Earth's axis. We receive the Sun's rays more directly in the summer because of the tilt. In the winter, we are tilted away from the Sun causing lower temperatures.

Without the tilt of the Earth's axis, there would be no variation in the length of day and night. The temperatures would remain the same throughout the year and we would not have seasons.
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WHAT IS A SOLSTICE?

In the Northern Hemisphere the longest day and shortest night of the year occur, marking the beginning of Summer. It's the reverse for the Southern Hemisphere. In March, the the Sun shines over the Tropic of Cancer at noon, above the Equator. In December, the the Sun shines over the Tropic of Capricorn at noon, below the Equator. During the two Solstices, the Sun is at its greatest distance from the Equator. For several days before and after each solstice, the sun appears to stand still in the sky. More specifically the noontime elevation does not seem to change. The Sun's position has reached its greatest distance above the equator, about 23 1/2 of arc.
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MOON PHASES



Moon Line Pic



New Moon Pic New Moon: The lighted side of the Moon faces away from the Earth. This means that the Sun, Earth, and Moon are almost in a straight line, with the Moon in between the Sun and the Earth. The Moon is not visible or looks very dark (except during a solar eclipse).
Waxing Crescent Moon Pic Waxing Crescent Moon: This Moon can be seen after the New Moon, but before the First Quarter Moon. This crescent will grow larger and larger every day, until the Moon becomes a First Quarter Moon.
First Quarter Moon Pic First Quarter Moon: The right half of the Moon appears lighted and the left side of the Moon appears dark. During the time between the New Moon and the First Quarter Moon, the part of the Moon that appears lighted gets larger and larger every day, and will continue to grow into a Full Moon.
Waxing Gibbous Moon Pic Waxing Gibbous Moon: This Moon can be seen after the First Quarter Moon, but before the Full Moon. The amount of the Moon that we can see will grow larger and larger every day. Waxing means increasing, or growing larger.
Full Moon Pic Full Moon: The lighted side of the Moon faces the Earth. This means that the Earth, Sun, and Moon are nearly in a straight line, with the Earth in the middle. The Moon that we see is very bright from the sunlight reflecting off it.
Waning Gibbous Moon Pic Waning Gibbous Moon: This Moon can be seen after the Full Moon, but before the Last Quarter Moon. The amount of the Moon that we can see will grow smaller and smaller every day. Waning means decreasing, or growing smaller.
Last Quarter Moon Pic Last Quarter Moon: Sometimes called Third Quarter. The left half of the Moon appears lighted, and the right side of the Moon appears dark. During the time between the Full Moon and the Last Quarter Moon, the part of the Moon that appears lighted gets smaller and smaller every day. It will continue to shrink into a New Moon, then the cycle starts all over again.
Waning Crescent Moon Pic Waning Crescent Moon: This Moon can be seen after the Last Quarter Moon and before the New Moon. This crescent will grow smaller and smaller every day, until the Moon becomes a New Moon.


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Moon Revolving Pic   More on the Moon   Moon Revolving Pic


Phases of the Moon ~ The revolution of the Moon around the Earth makes the Moon appear as if it's changing shape in the sky. This is caused by the different angles from which we see the bright part of the Moon's surface. The Moon passes through eight distinct, recognized stages during a cycle that repeats itself every 29.5 days (a lunar month). Four of those stages are considered major shapes. These are called "Phases" of the Moon.


A lunation is a lunar month, during which time the Moon completely circles the Earth in its orbit. Two other effects can be easily seen. First, due to the elliptical shape of the Moon's orbit, the apparent size of the Moon's disk changes as its distance from Earth varies. Second, although the Moon's near side directly faces the Earth on average, we get to view the Moon from slightly different angles as it orbits us. This effect is called libration and is caused partly by the tilt of the Moon's rotation axis with respect to its orbital plane. Also partly because the Moon's speed in its orbit varies but its rotation rate does not.


New Moon, First Quarter, Full Moon, and Last Quarter phases are considered to be primary phases and their dates and times are published in almanacs and on calendars. The two crescent and two gibbous phases are intermediate phases, each of which lasts for about a week between the primary phases.


The phases designate both the degree to which the Moon is illuminated and the geometric appearance of the illuminated part and always follow one another in the same order. During each lunar month, we see the Moon's appearance change from not visibly illuminated through partially illuminated to fully illuminated, then back through partially illuminated to not illuminated again.


The first time that the thin waxing crescent Moon is visible after New Moon (low in the evening sky just after sunset) marks the beginning of a month in the Islamic Calendar. A New Moon occurs when the Sun and Moon are quite close together in the sky. Full Moons occur when the Sun and Moon are at nearly opposite positions in the sky. This is why a Full Moon rises about the time of sunset and sets about the time of sunrise, for most places on Earth. The First and Last Quarters occur when the Sun and Moon are about 90 degrees apart in the sky. In fact, the two "half Moon" phases are called First Quarter and Last Quarter because they occur when the Moon is one- and three-quarters of the way around the sky (along its orbit) from New Moon.


When counting the number of days from a New Moon to one of the Moon Phases is called the Moon's "Age". Each complete cycle of phases is called a "Lunation". Since the cycle of the phases is shorter than most calendar months, the phase of the Moon at the very beginning of the month usually repeats at the very end of the month. When there are two Full Moons in a month (which occurs, on average, every 2.7 years), the second one is often called a "Blue Moon". This is where the phrase "Once in a Blue Moon" comes from.


Although Full Moons occur each month at a specific date and time, the Moon's disk may appear to be full for several nights in a row if it is clear. This is because the percentage of the Moon's disk that appears illuminated changes very slowly around the time of Full Moon. The same is true of a New Moon when the Moon is not visible at all. The Moon may appear 100% illuminated only on the night closest to the time of exact Full Moon. The nights before and after it will appear 97-99% illuminated and most people will not notice the difference. Even two days from a Full Moon the Moon's disk is 93-97% illuminated.


The primary phases of the Moon, New Moon, First Quarter, Full Moon, and Last Quarter, are defined to occur when the excess of the apparent ecliptic (celestial) longitude of the Moon over that of the Sun is 0, 90, 180, and 270 degrees. These definitions are used when the dates and times of the phases are computed for almanacs, calendars, etc.



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