#03544
Glenties (Fergus O'Byrne) video
#2341: YouTube video by Michael McGrath
©2012 ~ Used with permission ~

When the fog down from the mountain,
Drifts away across the glen,
Then the rain will soon be over,
And the sun will shine again.

Oh, the road on through to Glenties,
And the hills along the lough,
Come ye back into my memory,
May your wild north wind follow me home.

Swallows dance upon the heather,
Finding food for their young,
And the sheep they climb the mountain,
When their long, long day is done.

Oh, the road on through to Glenties,
And the hills along the lough,
Come ye back into my memory,
May your wild north wind follow me home.

There's a train that runs below here,
All the way along the lough,
Filled with ghosts of vanished people,
And the stories we have lost.

Oh, the road on through to Glenties,
And the hills along the lough,
Come ye back into my memory,
May your wild north wind.....
May your wild north wind follow me home.

####.... Maurice McGrath ....####
Recorded by Fergus O'Byrne with his son, Fergus Brown-O'Byrne on the accordion, on the CD Make The Circle Wide, a family project involving the direct descendants of Michael and Ellen McGrath and their spouses and partners.

From Wikipedia:
Glenties - (Irish: Na Gleannta, meaning "the glens") village in County Donegal, Ireland. It is situated where two glens meet, northwest of the Bluestack Mountains, near the confluence of two rivers, the Owenea and Stranaglough. Glenties is the largest centre of population in the parish of Iniskeel, and was the national winner of Ireland's Tidy Towns competition in 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962, and 1995. Other recent results include being a Gold Medal winner in 2004, 2005, and 2006 and a silver medal winner in 2003. Glenties also received a Silver Medal in the European Entente Florale competition held in Györ, Hungary in 2005. The current population of Glenties is 869.

Evidence of early settlement in the area is given by the many dolmens, standing stones and earthen ringforts dating from the Bronze Age. The area became part of the baronies of Boylagh and Bannagh in 1609, which was granted to Scottish undertakers as part of the Ulster Plantation.

Glenties was a regular stopping point on the road between the established towns of Ballybofey and Killybegs, and grew from this in the 17th and 18th centuries. The town was developed as a summer home for the Marquess Conyngham in the 1820s, because of its good hunting and fishing areas. The courthouse and market house were built in 1843. The Bank of Ireland building was completed in 1880.

A workhouse was built during the Great Famine at the site of the current Comprehensive School in 1846, serving the greater Inniskeel area. A 40-bed Fever Hospital was later added to care for the sick and dying. The landlord, Marquess Conyngham, decided to halve the population of the town in 1847, faced by the rising costs of the workhouse. Only those who could show title to their land as rentpayers were allowed to remain. The rest were given an option of going to America on a ship provided or entering the Workhouse in Glenties. Over 40,000 people died or emigrated from County Donegal between the years 1841 and 1851.



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