#03438
Great Harbour Deep (Shanneyganock) video
#2217: YouTube video by shanneyganock
©2011 ~ Used with permission ~

There's lumber and rusty old nails by the door,
We'll board up these houses and live here no more;
And even the gulls won't come up from the shore,
'Cause they know all the people are leavin'.

There's Tucker and Darcy and Skipper Tom Brown,
They pulled up the boats and a-battened them down;
She's another soul here that is stuck to the ground,
Everything's still as a tombstone.

We'll move to the city, we'll pay for our homes,
If the town was a body, it would be skin and bones;
What of the men we left here in the ground,
Who died breathin' life in that town?
The dreams of our fathers will die in their sleep,
When they put out the lights in Great Harbour Deep.

Things were much better when I was a lad,
When two workin' hands were all a man had;
The sea was our mother, she called us from land,
But now she seems like a stranger.

It's funny, they say there's no cod anymore,
But they find them in restaurants
and all the fine stores;
And thank God who said, stay away from our shores,
The foreigners must need the money.

So we'll move to the city, they pay for our homes,
If the town was a body, it would be skin and bones;
What of the men who we left here in the ground,
Who died breathin' life in that town?
The dreams of our fathers all died in their sleep,
When they put out the lights in Great Harbour Deep.

They're down at the powerhouse,
they'll soon throw the switch,
That will send us the darkness as black as the pitch;
And some guy up in Ottawa, that son-of-a-bitch,
In his own bed tonight he'll be keepin'.

So I'll say my goodbyes to the rocks and the trees,
And I'll walk through this splendour whenever I please;
Though the only way back here will be in my dreams,
Ya can't stop a fella from sleepin'.

So we'll move to the city, we'll pay for our homes,
If the town was a body, it would be skin and bones;
What of the men we left here in the ground,
Who died breathin' life in that town?
The dreams of our fathers all died in their sleep,
When they put out the lights in Great Harbour Deep.

Now there stands the city with wide-open arms,
And I'm sure now to some, well,
she does hold her charms;
There's prostitutes, drug dealers, strip joints and bars,
What a great place for raisin' your children.

So, we moved to the city, they pay for our homes,
After all this old town was just skin and bones;
And we left them old men who died in the ground,
Who died giving life to that town;
The dreams of our fathers all died in their sleep,
When they put out the lights in Great Harbour Deep.

We'll sink in the city, we'll pay for our homes,
If this town was a body, it would be skin and bones;
What of the men we left here in the ground,
Who died breathing life in that town?
The dreams of our fathers all died in their sleep,
When they put out the lights in Great Harbour Deep.

The ocean stands watchin', the vigil she'll keep,
She's the only one left now in Great Harbour Deep.

####.... J P Cormier of London, Ontario ....####
This is a variant of J P Cormier's ballad about the displacement of a small outport community on the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland that was only accessible by water or bush plane. The federal government cut funding to the town after the cod moratorium and spent millions to relocate the last residents. Shortly after that a logging company built a road into the area to harvest the trees.

Originally recorded by musician, singer-songwriter, J P Cormier [b.1969] with Ron Hynes (The Messenger - J P Cormier Sings, trk#12, 2008 CD, recorded at J P Cormier's studio and produced by Andre Bourgeois, Flash/Fontana North Distribution, Universal Music Group).

This variant is from an acoustic performance by Shanneyganock recorded live at the St John's Arts & Culture Center, February 20, 2011.


See more songs by Shanneyganock.

From The Newfoundland And Labrador Pilot by the Great Britain Hydrographic Dept, 1887:
Orange Bay, also called Great Harbour Deep, is a little more than ten miles southwest from Fourché Harbour. The bay extends two miles northwest by north and then forms two branches, Soufflets Arm and Pigeonniè Arm, the head of which latter, named Sault Cove, is completely barred by rocks. Cat Cove is just within the north point of the entrance, and contains a fishing establishment but affords no shelter. Jacques Cove, on the south shore one mile within the entrance, is also a fishing station, but in successive years the vessels that moored there were lost, and it is no longer used as an anchorage.



line

Index Page
GEST Songs Of Newfoundland And Labrador



line

~ Copyright Info ~

~ Privacy Policy ~

Confirm Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Here