#03482
Charming Blue-Eyed Mary (Stephanie Squires) video

See also: Charming Blue-Eyed Mary (Lehr and Best)
#2267: YouTube video by gdgest
©2013 ~ Used with permission ~

As I roved out one May morning,
one May morning so early,
'Twas there I spied a fair pretty maid,
'twas the charming blue-eyed Mary.

"Where are you going, my fair pretty maid,
Where are you going so early?"
"To milk my cows, kind sir," she said,
"From there on to my dairy."

"Can I go with you, my fair pretty maid,
Can I go with you so early?"
"Suit yourself, kind sir," she said,
"I'm your charming blue-eyed Mary."

It was arm in arm we walked along
Where no no one can blame me;
Many times I've wished to speak alone
With my charming blue-eyed Mary.

'Twas on a bank we both sat down,
Saying here's a token, Mary,
For the time has come and I must run,
My ship she sails so early.

He took a diamond ring from her hand,
Saying here's a token, Mary,
And in six long months I'll return again
To my charming blue-eyed Mary.

And six long months being past and gone,
No letter came to Mary,
Which caused her to view her diamond ring
As she sat in her dairy.

And seven long months being past and gone
She saw her true love coming,
Saying, "I'm just returning home from the sea
To my charming blue-eyed Mary.

"Now will you forsake of your houses and land,
Likewise your cows and dairy,
And be a sailor's bride on the sea,
My charming blue-eyed Mary?"

"Yes, I'll forsake of my houses and land,
Likewise my cows and dairy,
And be a sailor's bride on the sea,
I'm your charming blue-eyed Mary.

####.... Author unknown. Abbreviated variant of a 19th-century British broadside ballad, Blue-Eyed Mary, published by James Lindsay (Glasgow) sometime between 1851 and 1910, and archived at the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, shelfmark: 2806 c.14(149) ....####
The above video features a live performance with vocals and accordion by Stephanie Squires and bodhran by Phil Dinn during day two of the 1981 Newfoundland Folk Festival.

A variant was collected in 1977 from Dorman Ralph [1923-1999] of Little Harbour Deep and St John's, NL, by Genevieve Lehr and Anita Best and published as #19, Charming Blue-Eyed Mary, on pp.32-33 of Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook edited by Genevieve Lehr (University of Toronto Press © 1985/2003).

Genevieve Lehr noted that Dr Kenneth Goldstein writes of this song in The Livyere: "Though its theme of true love rewarded is not uncommon in folksong, this delightful ballad is rare indeed. The oldest version we know is from a songsheet or broadside printed by J Catnach in London in the early nineteenth century." Lehr also noted that Dorman Ralph learned many of his songs from his family and relatives - this one he learned from his Aunt Dorcas Ralph of White Bay, NL.



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