#03312
Croppy Winton (Johnny Quigley)

Now Winton was writer on the Orange Press
And wrote against Catholicks as you might guess,
Until those bold heros they call "Shelmaliers"
Attacked Bobby Winton and cut off his ears.

With a fol-de-mi-iddle a fol-de-mi-ail,
The fox in the trap he was caught by the tail;
So fill up your bumpers, my lads, without fail,
And drink to the health of Old Graunuail.

The first place they met him was on Saddle Hill,
Where the banner of freedom is flourishing still;
And they drew out a weapon that might be a shears,
And soon lacerated poor Winton's two ears.

With a fol-de-mi-iddle a fol-de-mi-ail,
The fox in the trap he was caught by the tail;
So fill up your bumpers, my lads, without fail,
And drink to the health of Old Graunuail.

His worthy companion he drew out his watch,
With handfuls of silver for fear of dispatch;
But we quickly assured him to quiet his fears,
That we wanted no bounty but Winton's two ears.

With a fol-de-mi-iddle a fol-de-mi-ail,
The fox in the trap he was caught by the tail;
So fill up your bumpers, my lads, without fail,
And drink to the health of Old Graunuail.

Judge Bolton went home for to seek an advice,
May he never come back, nor a bird of his price;
Judge Bolton went home to consult with his peers,
And to tell the sad story of winton's two ears.

With a fol-de-mi-iddle a fol-de-mi-ail,
The fox in the trap he was caught by the tail;
So fill up your bumpers, my lads, without fail,
And drink to the health of Old Graunuail.

And Daniel O'Connell unto him did say;
"Judge Barrister Bolton, what brings you this way?
If you're out for collecting blood-money in arrears,
You'd better bethink you of Winton's two ears."

One thousand, five hundred it was the reward
(I wish they'd give fifty unto a poor bard)
Och! How Ireland, Hibernia,
will laugh when she hears,
How the wild savage Injuns
cropped Winton's two ears.

With a fol-de-mi-iddle a fol-de-mi-ail,
The fox in the trap he was caught by the tail;
So fill up your bumpers, my lads, without fail,
And drink to the health of Old Graunuail.

Now Orangemen gentry wherever you be,
Whether in Newfoundland or home over the sea,
Don't treat the poor Papists
with scorn and with jeers,
Just remember what happened to Winton's two ears.

####.... Johnny Quigley ....####
Johnny Quigley was a first generation Irish-Newfoundlander from near Ferrans, Ireland, who arrived in Newfoundland in the early part of the 19th-century, worked as a carpenter in St John's, and wrote his ballads as the self-proclaimed Bard of Erin.

Note: GEST was unable to locate Ferrins or Ferrans town in County Wexford near which historians have noted Quigley lived, but found Ferrans situated on both sides of the county line in Meath and Kildare Counties, approximately 36 km (22 miles) west of Dublin, Ireland.

This is one of the oldest surviving ballads composed in Newfoundland but it was never printed until George M Story [1927-1994], PhD, Member of the Order of Canada, Professor of English and University Orator at Memorial University, and an editor of the Dictionary of Newfoundland English, presented his W S McNutt Lecture at the University of New Brunswick in Saint John and Fredericton on November 6 and 7, 1985, which was published in 1988 as A tune beyond us as we are: Reflections on Newfoundland Community Song and Ballad., on pp.133-134 of Newfoundland and Labrador Studies, Volume 4, Issue 2.

George M Story noted that Judge Bolton was the Englishman Henry John Boulton [1790-1870] who came to Newfoundland from Canada in 1833 as a harsh Chief Justice, and it was Daniel O'Connell [1775-1847], often referred to as The Liberator, or The Emancipator, who presented a petition to Parliament in London on behalf of the Newfoundland Reformers, urging Boulton's dismissal from office.

From the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online 1851-1860 (Volume VIII) by Patrick O'Flaherty © 2000 University of Toronto:
Henry David Winton [1793-1855] - printer and newspaperman born in Exmouth, England, who arrived in Newfoundland in 1818 and opened a wholesale and retail "Stationery Warehouse" which he maintained throughout his career as stationer, printer, bookseller, and publisher. Winton published the Public Ledger and Newfoundland General Advertiser, the fourth St John's newspaper from 1820 to 1855. Editorials which had been perceived as sectarian put the paper and Winton at odds with John Kent who was a young candidate in the campaign leading to the first general election under the new form of government and was an Irish merchant patronized by Catholic Bishop Michael Anthony Fleming. The attack in this ballad occurred on May 19, 1835, when Winton was travelling on horseback from Carbonear to Harbour Grace in the company of William Churchward who was on foot. While descending Saddle Hill, they were attacked by a group of about five people with painted faces. Winton was struck on the head by a stone - a blow that opened a large wound - and felled from his horse. More blows on the head followed. His ears were then stuffed with mud and gravel. One of the attackers opened a clasp-knife, cut two pieces from his right ear, and cut off the left one. Winton survived the ordeal, but despite an immediate official inquiry and a £1,500 reward offered by the government and merchants, the identity of his assailants remains a mystery. Thus, proof is lacking that Catholic animosity had anything to do with the mutilation. It was widely believed, however, that Catholics were indeed responsible.

From Wikipedia:
Graunuail [c.1530-c.1603] - Gráinne Ní Mháille, Gráinne O'Malley or Grace O'Malley was Queen of Umaill, chieftain of the Ó Máille clan and a pirate in 16th-century Ireland. She is commonly known by her nickname Granuaile or Gráinne Mhaol ("Bald Gráinne," a reference to her close-cropped hair as a young woman). Ní Mháille is an important figure in Irish folklore, and a historical figure in 16th-century Irish history, sometimes known as "The Sea Queen Of Connaught". She was born in Ireland around 1530, when Henry VIII was King of England and (at least in name) Lord of Ireland. Under the policies of the English government at the time, the semi-autonomous Irish princes and lords were left mostly to their own devices. However this was to change over the course of her life as the Tudor conquest of Ireland gathered pace. Many folk stories and legends about Ní Mháille have survived since her actual days of pirating and trading. There are also traditional songs and poems about her, and Granuaile has often been used as a personification of Ireland.
Shelmalier(e) - area in County Wexford, Ireland, comprising two baronies, East Shelmaliere and West Shelmaliere. The area is mentioned in the well-known Patrick Joseph McCall [1861-1919] Ballad Kelly The Boy From Killanne which was written about the Wexford rising to commemorate the centenary of the 1798 Rebellion and the brief hour of glory enjoyed by the insurgent forces. John Kelly was the son of a well-to-do merchant in Killanne, a small town in the barony of Bantry, County Wexford. He was a leader of the men of his district. His party joined the insurgents after the taking of Enniscorthy, and he was a leader of the party which cut off and defeated a party of reinforcements on their way to Wexford. Later he fought at Wexford, and was badly wounded while gallantly leading his men at New Ross. From there he was carried back to Wexford, but when the town was re-taken by the military he was hanged after a token-trial. After death his head was kicked around the street by soldiers.

From the Free Dictionary:
Bumpers - drinking vessels, glasses, tankards, etc., filled to the brim, especially for a toast.



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