#03372
8:30 Newfoundland (This Is Our Home)
(Mike Plume) videos
#2090 YouTube video by mikeplume
©2009 ~ Used with permission ~

Click Here for tabs.

From the rolling fields of wheat
to the busy city streets,
There's a feeling and a spirit all our own;
True North strong and free,
stand on guard you and me,
From the East to the West we roam.
This is our home.

From Norman Wells at the top,
all the way to the Rock,
There's a wind that's always blown;
From down Summerside to
the Queen Charlotte Islands,
There's a way of life we've always known.
This is our home.... This is our home.

I've seen the Northern Lights
dancing over Yellowknife,
While standing in the middle of a field;
From Pier 21 all the way to Flin Flon,
You gotta cross that Canadian Shield.
And no one knows winter like we know winter,
Blowing in off Lake Ontario;
From the Ottawa canal to Bonhomme Carnaval,
There's a little place I love in the Gatineaus,
With a covered bridge and a swimming hole.
Yeah, this is our home.... This is our home.

Yeah, from Portage and Main to Yonge and Queen,
And every street corner in between;
No matter where you go in this rugged land,
There's one thing we all understand,
Every woman, every child and man:
Eight-thirty Newfoundland,
Eight-thirty Newfoundland,
Eight-thirty Newfoundland.

Way up in Peace Country,
down East in Kings County,
And clear across to Thunder Bay,
Where Winnipeg feels like forever,
and Hope feels like never,
Let alone out Campbell River way;
And when you cross the border,
and you see a caribou on the quarter,
Then and only then will you be home.

I've driven from the Peg to the Chuck,
And Yankees call us Canucks;
But together we'll never stand alone,
Yeah, together we'll never stand alone;
Yeah, forever the Maple Leaf will be flown,
'Cause this is our home. (This is our home.)
And yeah, this is our home. (This is our home.)
This is our home. (This is our home.)
Man, this is our home.

Tar Sands in Fort Mac,
Redwood strands and Kitimat,
(This is our home.)
And down in the Shuswaps, too;
I've seen midnight feel like high noon,
(This is our home.)
From the Dome to Saskatoon;
I've been snowed in for days
on the Trans-Canada Highway,
And that was in the month of June!

And this is our home.

####.... Mike Plume and Jason McCoy ©2008 - all rights reserved. Theme music © Hinterland Who's Who (hww.ca), a program of the Canadian Wildlife Federation and Environment Canada 2003 ....####
Recorded by the Mike Plume Band (MPB830NFLD, trk#1, 2009 CD, Road Angel Entertainment, recorded at The Blue Room Studios, Nashville, Tennessee, produced by Brent Maher and Charles Yingling, and distributed by Fontana Distribution).

NOTES:
¹Canadians coast to coast recognize the 8:30 Newfoundland in the title from watching CBC Television. Hockey Night in Canada, 8:00 pm or 8:30 pm in Newfoundland.

²8:30 Newfoundland was used as the theme song for a feature documentary on CTV featuring the Canadian Men's Hockey team which won the Gold Medal in Vancouver, British Columbia.

³The original version of this song included this final stanza:

There's Confederation Bridge and Butternut Ridge,
Sudbury and the Sault;
I've lived in the Lakeland, I've been to the Badlands,
Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump, too.
This Is our home.

The video below was created with drawings by Mrs LaClaire's fifth grade class in Hanna, Alberta. Mike Plume told GEST: "I received loads of correspondence from classrooms across the country who used this song in various geography classes and history classes. There is no greater honour." Mike titled this video 8:30 Newfoundland (The New Official Video!!!).

#2097 YouTube video by mikeplume
©2012 ~ Used with permission ~

From Wikipedia:
Badlands - type of dry terrain where softer sedimentary rocks and clay-rich soils have been extensively eroded by wind and water. They contain steep slopes, loose dry soil, slick clay, and deep sand, all of which impede travel and other uses. Badlands form in semi-arid or arid regions with infrequent but intense rain-showers, sparse vegetation, and soft sediments: a recipe for massive erosion. The Big Muddy Badlands in Saskatchewan, Canada, gained notoriety as a hideout for outlaws. There is a large badland area in Alberta, Canada, particularly in the valley of the Red Deer River where Dinosaur Provincial Park is located as well as in Drumheller, Alberta where The Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology is located.
Bon Homme Carnival (Bonhomme Carnaval in French) - Quebec Winter Carnival festival held in Quebec City. The festival's events include a winter amusement park, with attractions such as skiing, snow rafting, ice sculptures, snow sled slides and outdoor shows, and it is usually held in February each year since 1955.
Butternut Ridge - former name of Havelock, New Brunswick, a rural community in Kings County, and the birthplace of Mike Plume, musician, songwriter, singer and leader of the Mike Plume Band (MPB).
Campbell River - coastal city in British Columbia on the east coast of Vancouver Island at the south end of Discovery Passage which lies along the important coastal Inside Passage shipping route. Long touted as the Salmon Capital of the World and bound by water and mountains, the city is surrounded by wilderness and is blessed with mild weather.
Canadian Shield (Laurentian Plateau, or Bouclier Canadien in French) - vast geological shield covered by a thin layer of soil that forms the nucleus of the North American or Laurentia craton. It is an area mostly composed of igneous rock which relates to its long volcanic history. It has a deep, common, joined bedrock region in Eastern and central Canada and stretches North from the Great Lakes to the Arctic Ocean, covering over half of Canada; it also extends South into the Northern reaches of the United States. Human population is sparse, and industrial development is minimal, while mining is very prevalent.
Canuck (often Johnny Cannuk) - slang term for Canadians, often used as a name for Canadians in animated TV shows such as The Simpsons by Fox entertainment. The origins of the word are uncertain. Canadians use Canuck as an affectionate or merely descriptive term for their nationality. Other nationalities may use the word as an affectionate, or derogatory, or merely a descriptive term.
Dome (Snow Dome) - mountain located on the Continental Divide in the Columbia Icefield, at the intersection of Banff National Park, and Jasper National Park, on the Alberta and British Columbia border in Canada. The mountain was named in 1898 by J Norman Collie because its snow-capped massif resembles a dome.
Flin Flon - Canadian mining city, named after a science fiction literary character, located on the border of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, with the majority of the city located within Manitoba.
Fort Mac (Fort McMurray) - urban service area in the Regional Municipality (RM) of Wood Buffalo in Alberta, Canada. The community has played a significant role in the history of the petroleum industry in Canada. Fort McMurray is considered the heart of one of Alberta's (and Canada's) major hubs of oil production, located near the Athabasca Oil Sands. Besides the oil (or tar) sands, the economy also relies on natural gas and oil pipelines, forestry and tourism. Oil sands companies include Syncrude, Suncor Energy, CNRL, Shell, and Nexen. Fort McMurray's growth is characteristic of a boomtown. Housing prices and rents are far higher than one would expect in such a remote area.
Gatineaus (Gatineau Hills) - geological formation in Canada that makes up part of the southern tip of the Canadian Shield, and acts as the northern shoulder of the Ottawa Valley. They are also the foothills of the Laurentian Mountains which stretch east through Quebec, beginning north of Montreal and joining up with others into Vermont and New Hampshire.
Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump - 300 metre (1000 feet) long cliff located where the foothills of the Rocky Mountains begin to rise from the prairie 18 km northwest of Fort Macleod, Alberta, Canada on highway 785. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and home of a museum of Blackfoot culture. The buffalo jump was used for 5,500 years by the indigenous peoples of the plains to kill buffalo by driving them off the 11 metre (36 foot) high cliff. Before the late introduction of horses, the Blackfoot drove the buffalo from a grazing area in the Porcupine Hills about 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) west of the site to the drive lanes, lined by hundreds of cairns, by dressing up as coyotes and wolves. These specialized buffalo runners were young men trained in animal behavior to guide the buffalo into the drive lanes. Then, at full gallop, the buffalo would fall from the weight of the herd pressing behind them, breaking their legs and rendering them immobile.
Hope - district municipality located at the confluence of the Fraser and Coquihalla rivers in the province of British Columbia, Canada. Hope is at the eastern end of both the Fraser Valley and the Lower Mainland region, and is at the southern end of the Fraser Canyon. To the east over the Cascade Mountains is the Interior region, beginning with the Similkameen Country on the farther side of the Allison Pass in Manning Park. Located 154 kilometres (96 mi) east of Vancouver, Hope is at the southern terminus of the Coquihalla Highway and the western terminus of the Crowsnest Highway, locally known as the Hope-Princeton (Highways 5 and 3, respectively), where they merge with the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 1). Hope is at the eastern terminus of Highway 7.
Kings County - located in southern New Brunswick, Canada, with both the Saint John and Kennebecasis rivers passing through it, and approximately half the population living in the suburbs of the nearby city of Saint John.
Kitimat - coastal city in northwestern British Columbia, in the Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine. The Kitimat Valley is part of the most populous urban district in Northwest British Columbia, which includes Terrace to the north along the Skeena river valley. The city is a company town planned and built by the Aluminum Company of Canada (Alcan) during the 1950s. It is located on tidewater in one of the few wide-flat valleys on the coast of British Columbia. The Kitimat Valley is one of the few locations on Canada's Pacific coast that has substantial room for affordable growth.
Lakeland - provincial park and provincial recreation area located east of Lac La Biche, Alberta, Canada, in Lac La Biche County. Lakeland Provincial Park includes the following lakes: Black Duck, Blackett, Brown, Dabbs, Jackson, Kinnaird, McGuffin, Shaw, and Snake. Lakeland Provincial Recreation Area includes Ironwood Lake which is fed by nearby Lakes Helena, Home, and Frenchman. Ironwood Lake empties into Rich Lake and then into the Beaver River.
Norman Wells (Slavey language: Tłegǫ́hłı̨ meaning where there is oil) - regional centre for the Sahtu Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. The subarctic town is situated on the north side of the Mackenzie River and provides a view down the valley of the Franklin and Richardson Mountains.
Ottawa Canal (Rideau Canal) - also known as the Rideau Waterway, connects the city of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, on the Ottawa River to the city of Kingston, Ontario, on Lake Ontario. The name Rideau, French for curtain, is derived from the curtain-like appearance of the Rideau River's twin waterfalls where they join the Ottawa River. The canal was opened in 1832 as a precaution in case of war with the United States and is still in use today, with most of its original structures intact. The canal system uses sections of major rivers, including the Rideau and the Cataraqui, as well as some lakes. It is the oldest continuously operated canal system in North America, and in 2007 was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Peace Country (Peace River Country) - aspen parkland region around the Peace River in Canada. It spans from northwestern Alberta to the Rocky Mountains in northeastern British Columbia, where the region is also referred to as the Peace River Block.
Pier 21 - Canada's National Museum of Immigration in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Operated as an ocean liner terminal and immigration shed from 1928 to 1971, it became an immigration museum in 1999. Pier 21 is Canada's last remaining ocean immigration shed. The facility is often compared to Ellis Island in the USA, although this term is also used to describe the immigration station at Grosse Isle, Quebec. It was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1996, and was named a National Museum of Canada in 2009.
Queen Charlotte Islands - unofficial name for Haida Gwaii (Islands of the People), an archipelago on the North Coast of British Columbia, Canada. Haida Gwaii consists of two main islands: Graham Island in the north, and Moresby Island in the south, along with approximately 150 smaller islands with a total landmass of 10,180 km2 (3,931 sq mi). Other major islands include Anthony, Langara, Louise, Lyell, Burnaby, and Kunghit Islands.
Saskatoon - most populous city in central Saskatchewan, Canada, on the South Saskatchewan River. It is divided into east and west sides by the river.
Sault (Sault Ste. Marie) - city on the St Marys River in Algoma District, Ontario, Canada. It is the third largest city in Northern Ontario after Sudbury and Thunder Bay. To the south, across the river, is the United States and the city of Sault Ste Marie, Michigan. The two cities are joined by the International Bridge, which connects Interstate 75 on the Michigan side and Huron Street (and former Ontario Secondary Highway 550B) on the Ontario side. Shipping traffic in the Great Lakes system bypasses the Saint Mary's Rapids via the American Soo Locks, the world's busiest canal in terms of tonnage that passes through it, while smaller recreational and tour boats use the Canadian Sault Ste Marie Canal.
Shuswaps - term used in the Canadian province of British Columbia to refer to the environs of Shuswap Lake. Roughly defined, the Shuswap Country begins on the west of Shuswap basin at the town of Chase, British Columbia, located on Little Shuswap Lake, west of which is the South Thompson area of the Thompson Country, and includes Adams Lake to the northwest of Shuswap Lake as well as communities in the Eagle River area as far as Craigellachie and/or Three Valley Gap, which is at the summit of Eagle Pass, beyond which eastwards is the Columbia Country.
Sudbury (Greater Sudbury) - largest city in Northern Ontario by population, and the largest city in all of Ontario by land area. Compounded by open coke beds in the early to mid 20th-century and logging for fuel, the area suffered a near-total loss of native vegetation. Consequently, the region became blanketed with exposed rocky outcrops permanently stained charcoal black, first by the air pollution from the roasting yards then by the acid rain in a layer which penetrates up to three inches into the once pink-gray granite. The construction of the mining company Inco's Superstack in 1972 dispersed sulphuric acid over a much wider area, reducing the acidity of local precipitation and enabling the city to begin an environmental recovery program. In the late 1970s, private and public interests combined to establish a regreening effort. Lime was spread over the charred soil by hand and by aircraft. Seeds of wild grasses and other vegetation were also spread. As of 2010, 9.2 million new trees have been planted in the city. The mining company Vale has begun to rehabilitate the slag heaps surrounding their smelter in the Copper Cliff area with the planting of grass and trees.
Summerside - Canadian city in Prince County, Prince Edward Island. It is the second largest city in the province and the principal municipality for the western part of the island.
Thunder Bay - most populous municipality in Northwestern Ontario, the city takes its name from the immense Thunder Bay at the head of Lake Superior, known on 18th-century French maps as Baie du Tonnerre (Bay of Thunder). The city is often referred to as the Lakehead or Canadian Lakehead because of its location at the end of Great Lakes navigation.
Trans-Canada Highway - federal-provincial highway system that travels through all ten provinces of Canada. It is, along with the Trans-Siberian Highway and Australia's Highway 1, one of the world's longest national highways, with the main route spanning 8,030 km (4,990 mi).
Winnipeg - capital and largest city of Manitoba, Canada, and the primary municipality of the Winnipeg Capital Region, with more than half of Manitoba's population. It is located near the longitudinal centre of North America, at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers (a point commonly known as The Forks).
Yellowknife - capital and largest city of the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada. It is located on the northern shore of Great Slave Lake, approximately 400 km (250 mi) south of the Arctic Circle, on the west side of Yellowknife Bay near the outlet of the Yellowknife River. Yellowknife and its surrounding water bodies were named after a local Dene tribe once known as the Copper Indians or Yellowknife Indians (now referred to locally as the Yellowknives Dene (First Nation) who traded tools made from copper deposits near the Arctic Coast. In the Dogrib language, the city is known as Somba K'e (where the money is).



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Notes On Guitar Tabs:
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
All guitar tabs have been contributed by visitors to this site and represent their interpretation of the tune. We are unable to verify their accuracy.

[G] From the rolling fields of wheat to the [D] busy city streets,
There's a [Em] feeling and a spirit all our [C] own;
True [G] North strong and free, stand on [D] guard you and me,
[Em] From the east to the west we [C] roam.
This is our [G] home.

[G] From Norman Wells at the top, all the [D] way to the rock,
There's a [Em] wind that's always [C] blown;
From [G] down Summerside to the [D] Queen Charlotte Islands,
There's a [Em] way of life we've always [C] known.
This is our [G] home.... This is our [C] home.

I've [G] seen the Northern Lights dancing [D] over Yellowknife,
While [Em] standing in the middle of a [C] field;
From [G] Pier 21 all the [D] way to Flin Flon,
You gotta [Em] cross that Canadian [C] Shield.
And [G] no one knows winter like [D] we know winter,
Blowing [Em] in off Lake Ont-[C] ario;
From the [G] Ottawa canal to Bon-[D] homme Carnaval,
There's a [Em] little place I love in the [C] Gatineaus,
With a [Em] covered bridge and a swimming [C] hole.
Yeah, this is our [G] home.... This is our [C] home. [D]

Yeah, from Port-[Em] age and Main to [D] Yonge and Queen,
And [G] every street corner in [C] between,
No mat-[Em] ter where you go in [D] this rugged land,
There's [G] one thing we all under-[C] stand,
Every wo-[Em] man, every child and [C] man:
Eight-thirty Newfound-[G] land,
Eight-thirty Newfound-[C] land,
Eight-thirty Newfound-[G] land.

[G] Way up in Peace Country, down [D] east in Kings County,
And [Em] clear across to Thunder [C] Bay,
Where Winni-[G] peg feels like forever, and [D] Hope feels like never,
Let al-[Em] one out Campbell [C] River way;
And [G] when you cross the border, and see a [D] caribou on the quarter,
Then and [Em] only then will you be [C] home.

I've driven from the [G] Peg to the Chuck,
And Yankees call [D] us Canucks;
But [Em] together we'll never stand [C] alone,
Yeah, [Em] together we'll never stand [C] alone;
Yeah, [Em] forever the Maple Leaf will be [C] flown,
'Cause this is [G] our home. (This is our [C] home.)
And yeah, this is our [G] home. (This is our [C] home.)
This is our [G] home. (This is our [C] home.)
Man, this is our [G] home.

Tar [G] sands in Fort Mac,
Redwood [D] strands in Kitimat,
(This is our [G] home.)
And [Em] down in the Shuswaps, [C] too;
I've [G] seen midnight feel like [D] high noon,
(This is our [G] home.)
From the [Em] Dome to Saska-[C] toon,
I've been [G] snowed in for days on the Trans [D] Canada Highway,
And [Em] that was in the month of [C] June!

[G]                [D]

And this Is our home. [Em]      [C]       [G]

Unrecorded stanza:
There's Con-[G] federation Bridge
and [D] Butternut Ridge,
[Em] Sudbury and the [C] Sault;
I've [G] lived in the Lakeland,
I've been [D] to the Badlands,
Head [Em] Smashed In Buffalo Jump, [C] too.


line

Index Page
GEST Songs Of Newfoundland And Labrador



line

~ Copyright Info ~

~ Privacy Policy ~

Confirm Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Here