#03241
Homes And Girls Of Newfoundland (T M Brown)

Let others sing of Southern climes,
of vine-clad hills and rosy bowers,
Where nature rings her sweetest chimes,
mid verdant vales and fragrant flowers;
My humble lyre more proudly wakes
to themes that woo a master's hand -
The dark-browed hills, the ruffled lakes,
the homes and girls of Newfoundland.

What though upon her rugged coast
the storm-lash'd billows madly foam?
They bear a race, our pride and boast,
who love their sea-girt island home;
And though her hills, rock-ribb'd and bare,
are seldom kissed by zephyrs bland,
They shelter homes where beauty rare
adorn the girls of Newfoundland.

Within these homes dwell manly worth,
and generous hearts and friendly hands,
And simple joys and guileless mirth,
and children's merry prattling bands;
And spirits bold as ever dared
old ocean's perils, wild and grand;
Her homes and girls they'll proudly guard -
the hardy sons of Newfoundland.

Her daughters fair, with healthy cheeks
and buoyant step, I see pass by;
Each tender glance the language speaks
of love's own thrilling witchery;
Their gentle smiles and willing arts,
what manly bosom can withstand?
Supreme they rule o'er willing hearts -
the maids and wives of Newfoundland.

From iron-bound, stern Labrador,
to fair Placentia's sunny wave,
To win a part of ocean's store,
her sons the treacherous billows brave;
And when returned with hard-won spoil,
what joy to clasp each loving hand,
Heaven's choicest blessing on them smile:
the homes and girls of Newfoundland.

####.... T M Brown from St John's, Newfoundland ....####
Published by Gerald S Doyle in Old-Time Songs And Poetry Of Newfoundland: Songs Of The People From The Days Of Our Forefathers, First edition, p.19, 1927.

Gerald Doyle noted that T M Brown was an Irishman who was well known in St John's in the good old days. He was a carpenter by trade, but was gifted with a musical and poetical nature. Doyle went on to write that perhaps some of his readers will remember the gifted composer.

From The Newfoundland Quarterly 1920-21 (Volume 20) Article 14 by John J Evans, founder, printer and proprietor:
More than half a century ago a scholarly gentleman named Browne arrived here from the Emerald Isle and spent a year or two with us. He had been, it was said, master of some college in the old country. Anyway, we called him Professor Browne. Beyond these few facts we knew little of him. He was a literary man and, during his sojourn with us, contributed several items in prose and poetry to the local press. Among his poetical effusions I find the following verses, entitled The Homes and Girls Of Newfoundland.



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