#03255
The Banks Of Newfoundland #9
(English - Gerald S Doyle)
See also: Banks Of Newfoundland:
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Ye rambling boys of pleasure,
I have you to beware,
If ever you sail in a Yankee ship,
no dungaree jumpers wear;
But have your monkey jacket
always at your command,
For beware of the cold nor'westers
on the Banks of Newfoundland.

So, boys, fill your glasses,
and merrily they'll go 'round,
And we'll drink a health to the captain
and the girls from Liverpool town.

We had one Lynch from Ballana Hinch,
Jim Doyle and Michael Moore,
In the year of '56,
when our sailors suffered sore;
They pawned their clothes in Liverpool
and sold them out of hand,
Not thinking of the cold nor'westers
on the Banks of Newfoundland.

So, boys, fill your glasses,
and merrily they'll go 'round,
And we'll drink a health to the captain
and the girls from Liverpool town.

Our captain being a Yankee,
our first mate was the same,
Our second mate an Irishman
from Limerick town he came;
And all the rest were Irish boys,
they came from Paddy's land,
Only four or five of our seamen
belonged to Newfoundland.

So, boys, fill your glasses,
and merrily they'll go 'round,
And we'll drink a health to the captain
and the girls from Liverpool town.

We had one female kind on board,
Bridget Walsh it was her name,
To her I promised marriage;
on me she had a claim;
She tore her flannel petticoat
to make mittens for my hands,
Saying, "I can't see my true love freeze
on the Banks of Newfoundland."

So, boys, fill your glasses,
and merrily they'll go 'round,
And we'll drink a health to the captain
and the girls from Liverpool town.

One night as I lay on my bed,
I had a pleasant dream,
I dreamt I was in Liverpool
away down in city field,
With a comely maiden beside me
and a jug of beer in hand,
But I woke quite broken hearted
on the Banks of Newfoundland.

So, boys, fill your glasses,
and merrily they'll go 'round,
And we'll drink a health to the captain
and the girls from Liverpool town.

But now, my boys, we have fair winds,
and our ship she's bound to go,
So see boys scattered around her decks
shovelling off the snow;
We'll wash down and scrub her 'round
with holystone and sand,
And we'll bid adieu to the Virgin Rocks
on the Banks of Newfoundfland.

So, boys, fill your glasses,
and merrily they'll go 'round,
And we'll drink a health to the captain
and the girls from Liverpool town.

The steamboat she's ahead of us,
for New York we are bound,
Where the boarding masters and runners
they all come flocking 'round;
Some they go to sprees and balls,
and more drive out so grand,
But little they know of the nor'west wind
on the Banks of Newfoundland.

So, boys, fill your glasses,
and merrily they'll go 'round,
And we'll drink a health to the captain
and the girls from Liverpool town.

So, boys, fill your glasses,
and merrily they'll go 'round,
And we'll drink a health to the captain
and the girls from Liverpool town.

####.... Author unknown. Variant of a British broadside ballad [Laws K25] American Balladry From British Broadsides (G Malcolm Laws, 1957) ....####
This is a much longer variant than #8 collected in 1959 from Allan MacArthur [1884-1971] of Upper Ferry, NL, by Kenneth Peacock. It readily demonstrates how much oral tradition changed the song over the 32 years since 1927 when Gerald S Doyle published this variant in Old-Time Songs And Poetry Of Newfoundland: Songs Of The People From The Days Of Our Forefathers. Doyle noted: "There are very few who remember the time when this song first appeared. It deals with a sailing vessel over seventy years ago. The song was very popular on board our foreign going vessels forty or fifty years ago. We might say that it is an entirely different air from the anthem The Banks Of Newfoundland."


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