#03002
Súil A Grá (Morgan and Best) videos
See also: Siúl A Ghrá (Lehr and Best)
#1721: YouTube video by figgyduffband
©2010 ~ Used with permission ~

Súil, súil, súil a grá,
Súil go socair agus súil a dhrá,
Súil go doras agus éalaigh,
Is go dtí a mhúirnín, slán.

My love has gone to France,
To seek his fortune in advance;
When he comes home I'll give him my chance,
Is go dté a mhúirnín, slán.

Súil, súil, súil a grá,
Súil go socair agus súil a dhrá,
Súil go doras agus éalaigh,
Is go dtí a mhúirnín, slán.

I'll go up on yonder hill,
And there I'll sit and cry my fill,
Every tear will turn a mill,
Is go dté a mhúirnín, slán.

Súil, súil, súil a grá,
Súil go socair agus súil a dhrá,
Súil go doras agus éalaigh,
Is go dtí a mhúirnín, slán.

I'll sell my rock, I'll sell my reel,
And my glasses but I'll sell my wheel,
Buy my love a coat of steel,
Is go dté a mhúirnín, slán.

Súil, súil, súil a grá,
Súil go socair agus súil a dhrá,
Súil go doras agus éalaigh,
Is go dtí a mhúirnín, slán.

I'll dye my petticoats, dye them red,
Around the world I'll beg my bread,
Till my parents wish me dead,
Is go dté a mhúirnín, slán.

Súil, súil, súil a grá,
Súil go socair agus súil a dhrá,
Súil go doras agus éalaigh,
Is go dtí a mhúirnín, slán.

####.... Author unknown. Variant of an Irish traditional ....####
Recorded by Pamela Morgan and Anita Best with the Figgy Duff Band (The Colour Of Amber / Anita Best, Pamela Morgan, trk#1, 1991, Amber Music, Topsail, NL, produced by Noel Dinn [Hagdown Music] and Gary Furniss [No Escape Music] associate producer Glen Tilley).

See more songs by Pamela Morgan.

See more songs by Anita Best.

A variant was collected by Genevieve Lehr and Anita Best in 1976 as Siúl A Ghrá from John Joe English [1896-1991] of Branch, St Mary's Bay, NL, and published as #96, in Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook, pp.165-166, edited by Genevieve Lehr (University of Toronto Press © 1985/2003).

Excerpted from Folk Music From The Catskill Mountains And Hudson River Valley by Bob Lusk, Kingston, New York:

In 1688 Ireland, rebellion broke out and was crushed by William of Orange. The 1691 treaty of Limerick provided honorable terms for the Irish warriors: they could take an oath of allegiance to England, or they could leave their native land for exile and military service on the European continent. These were the famed "Wild Geese" of the Irish Brigade who served with the French, hoping somehow they eventually would drive the English out of Ireland. The majority of Ireland's leaders chose exile. There remained to them hope that they might one day come home with sword in hand under the leadership of a "Kings's son from across the sea" to deliver their country from the hated British rule. This song recorded a nation's desolation, and the glimmering spark of its hope, still lingering in defeat.

Irish immigrants to the New World brought this song with them. It rooted itself in American soil, and became a lament for militiamen leaving to fight the French or the British. The Gaelic refrain dropped away, or survived only as a nonsense rhyme.

Approximate chorus translation by GEST:


     Hoping, hoping, hoping to love,
     Very quietly hoping and hoping to draft;
     The secret to his saga,
     It is up to my beloved, farewell.

#1571: YouTube video by oldirishladdie
©2010 ~ Used with permission ~


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