#03003
Siúl A Ghrá (Lehr & Best)
See also: Súil A Grá (Morgan & Best)

My love is gone to France,
To seek a fortune in advance;
When he comes back there'll be a chance.
Is go dtí a mo mhúirnín, slaínte.

Siúl, siúl, siúl a ghrá,
Siúl go socair agus, siúl a dhrá,
Is go dtí a saga [sic] rún,
Is go dtí a mo mhúirnín, slaínte.

I'll dye my petticoat, dye it red,
Around the world I'll beg my bread,
Until my parents wish me dead,
Is go dtí a mo mhúirnín, slaínte.

Siúl, siúl, siúl a ghrá,
Siúl go socair agus, siúl a dhrá,
Is go dtí a saga [sic] rún,
Is go dtí a mo mhúirnín, slaínte.

I'll sell my lock, I'll sell my reel,
When my flax is spun I'll sell my wheel,
And buy my love a sword and steel,
Is go dtí a mo mhúirnín, slaínte.

Siúl, siúl, siúl a ghrá,
Siúl go socair agus, siúl a dhrá,
Is go dtí a saga [sic] rún,
Is go dtí a mo mhúirnín, slaínte.

I'll go up on yonder hill,
There I'll sit and cry my fill,
Every tear will turn a mill,
Is go dtí a mo mhúirnín, slaínte.

Siúl, siúl, siúl a ghrá,
Siúl go socair agus, siúl a dhrá,
Is go dtí a saga [sic] rún,
Is go dtí a mo mhúirnín, slaínte.

####.... Author unknown. Variant of an Irish traditional ....####

This variant was collected in 1976 by Genevieve Lehr and Anita Best from John Joe English [1896-1991] of Branch, St Mary's Bay, NL, and published as #96, in Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook, pp.165-166, edited by Genevieve Lehr (University of Toronto Press © 1985/2003).

Notes by Genevieve Lehr:

1) Following the Williamite Wars in Ireland and the signing of the Treaty of Limerick, the Irish army went to France in 1691 to serve under the French king. Siú A Ghrá is the lament of a girl for her love who fled Ireland to seek his fortune in France.

2) Below I have given some attempt to indicate how the Gaelic is pronounced. Note that dtí is pronounced more like 'dean' than 'dee'. This is due to the fact that in the dialect of Gaelic spoken in Waterford where many Irish Newfoundlanders originated, all final vowels were nasalized or had an 'n' added to them.

  Shule, shule, shule agraw
  Shule go soca(r)t agus shule a draw
  Is go dean a sage rune
  Is go dean a mavourneen, slanta.

3)In the above refrain, the girl is wishing her love farewell until she sees him again, and hoping he will be safe. Dying her petticoat red means that she is loyal to her love. The word lock in the song refers to loose fragments of wool or cotton twisted around the finger of a spinner at the distaff.

A variant was recorded as Súil A Grá by Pamela Morgan and Anita Best with the Figgy Duff Band (The Colour Of Amber / Anita Best, Pamela Morgan, trk#1, 1991, Amber Music, Topsail, NL, produced by Noel Dinn [Hagdown Music] and Gary Furniss [No Escape Music] associate producer Glen Tilley).

See more songs by Pamela Morgan.

Approximate chorus translation by GEST:

Walk, walk, walk, my love,
Walk calmly and hope that a draft,
Walks up to the door and escapes,
It will be my beloved, cheers.


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