#02995
Tommie (English traditional folk song)

As Tommie was walking one fine summer day,
Some rosy-cheeked apples him saw on his way;
Him saw on his way, yes, him saw on his way,
Some rosy-cheeked apples him saw on his way.

Those rosy-cheeked apples they seemed to be,
Some way from the ground,
so him climbed up the tree;
Him climbed up the tree,
yes, him climbed up the tree,
Some way from the ground,
so him climbed up the tree.

So Tommie did climb, and the tree him did fall,
And down came poor Tommie, tree, apples and all;
Tree, apples and all, yes, tree, apples and all,
So down came poor Tommie, tree, apples and all.

And after his tumble poor Tommie was sore,
Him vowed that he'd never steal apples no more;
Steal apples no more, no, steal apples no more,
Him vowed that he'd never steal apples no more.

####.... Author unknown. Traditional English folk song ....####
This old song came to GEST by way of Lorraine Kennery whose grandmother was born and raised in Newfoundland (c.1901) and used to sing it. The lyrics were published in The Jamboree Book, 1920, a souvenir book published by the Boy Scout Association to commemorate the successful 1920 completion of the 1st World Jamboree at Olympia Arena in London, England. Held under the direction of the Council of the Boy Scouts Association and the personal leadership of the Chief Scout, Sir Robert Baden-Powell, the Jamboree marked an important landmark in the history of Scouting. The Jamboree hosted approximately 8,000 Scouts from 34 countries.

This particular song was performed in the arena by 80 scouts from Herefordshire who presented a scenic display of their county industries, charms and customs a century ago. Included was the ancient ceremony of blessing the young apples in which a pole with a large bough of mistletoe, a white gloved hand, flowers and charms fixed to the top, was erected in an orchard. The boys danced an old folk dance during which one of them enacted a fall from an apple tree so that ancient first aid could be applied to his broken leg.
~ Excerpted from the Boy Scout Association's Jamboree Book, 1920.

Herefordshire County is one of the most rural and sparsely populated in England. The land use is predominantly agricultural and the county is well known for the Hereford cattle breed and its fruit and cider production.



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