#02938
Nantem Minuataman (Greg Penashue)
(I Have Always Loved It)
Click for English translation below

Tshima nantem nantem minuataman,
Nantem minuataman;
Tshima nantem, nantem minuataman entu-unanut.

Minuat mak Innut tshe itutet nutshimit,
Minuat mak Innu tshe nantu-kusset;
Enuet ma nenu tshi uauitshitupant,
Tshima nantem nantem minuataman.

Tshima nantem nantem minuataman,
Nantem minuataman;
Tshima nantem, nantem minuataman entu-unanut.

Minuat mak Innut utuassimuau,
Minuat mak Innut utshimashkuessimuau;
Enuet ma nenu tshi uauitshitupant,
Tshima nantem nantem minuataman.

Tshima nantem nantem minuataman,
Nantem minuataman;
Tshima nantem, nantem minuataman entu-unanut.

Minuat mak Innut tshe itutet nutshimit,
Minuat mak Innu tshe nantu-kusset;
Enuet ma nenu tshi uauitshitupant,
Tshima nantem nantem minuataman.

Tshima nantem nantem minuataman,
Nantem minuataman;
Tshima nantem, nantem minuataman entu-unanut.

####.... Author unknown. Innu traditional. Transcript by Ann Rich (Nuna) ....####
This song, from the Quebec north shore, reflects on the Innu's love of their traditional lifestyle and their hope that this lifestyle will continue.

Recorded in his native tongue by Greg Penashue (Compilation album: Our Labrador, trk#8, 1993, Butter & Snow Productions, produced by Glen Tilley/Shirley Montague, recorded at Studio F, CBC Radio, St John's, NL and engineered by Terry Winsor).

Liner Notes: Gregory Penashue, who makes his home in the community of Sheshashits, was born in a canvas tent in the Mealey Mountains. He is one of the first performers to come out of Labrador's Innu community. Greg has been a featured artist at festivals and on radio, and he has paved the way for a new generation of Innu artists.

From Wikipedia:
Innu - indigenous inhabitants of an area they refer to as Nitassinan, which comprises most of what non-First Nations Canadians refer to as northeastern Quebec and Labrador. Their population in 2003 includes about 18,000 people, of which 15,000 live in Quebec. Their ancestors were known to have lived on these lands as hunter-gatherers for several thousand years, living in tents made of animal skins. Their subsistence activities were historically centred on hunting and trapping caribou, moose, deer and small game. Some coastal clans also practised agriculture, fished, and managed maple sugarbush. Their language, Innu-aimun or Montagnais, is spoken throughout Nitassinan, with certain dialect differences. Innu-aimun is related to the language spoken by the Cree of the James Bay region of Quebec and Ontario.



English translation by:
Ettienne Tshakapesh and Ann Rich (Nuna)

I have always always loved this,
Loved this,
I have always always loved it
when it's time to go hunting.

The time has come for the Innu to go to the country,
The time has come for the Innu to go fishing;
They have always helped each other,
I have always always loved this, loved this.

I have always always loved this,
Loved this,
I have always always loved it
when it's time to go hunting.

The time has come again for their children,
The time has come again for their spirits;
They have always helped each other,
I have always loved this, loved this.

I have always always loved this,
Loved this,
I have always always loved it
when it's time to go hunting.

The time has come for the Innu to go to the country,
The time has come for the Innu to go fishing;
They have always helped each other,
I have always always loved this, loved this.

I have always always loved this,
Loved this,
I have always always loved it
when it's time to go hunting.


line

Index Page
GEST Songs Of Newfoundland And Labrador



line

~ Copyright Info ~

~ Privacy Policy ~

Confirm Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Here