#02838
The Girl I Met From Fogo (Johnny Burke)

I met a fair damsel, came over from Fogo,
To look for a place in a Water Street store,
And being a stranger she struck on yours truly,
Got down on her knees and did humbly implore;
I brought her to Knowling's
to show her the dainties,
Delighted that day at the kind words she said,
I showed her the marbles,
they call them the paintees,
And the railway on top with the balls over head.

Arrah go on, you're only joking,
Let me alone, you're only fooling,
Arrah behave, you're simply fooling,
Arrah go off, go way, go widdy,
Go way, go widdy, go way, go on.

Sure she suits me next fall, and I only a stranger,
And praises and blessings on me did bestow,
A nice string of flippers came out of the Ranger,
And a loaf of sweet bread
that was pretty well dough;
A quintal of fish and a barrel of potatoes,
A firkin of sounds for to use at our meals,
A pair of yarn socks that belonged to her father,
Just reached to my ankles and in the heels.

Arrah go on, you're only joking,
Let me alone, you're only fooling,
Arrah behave, you're simply fooling,
Arrah go off, go way, go widdy,
Go way, go widdy, go way, go on.

####.... Johnny Burke [1851-1930] of St John's, NL ....####
Published in Burke's Popular Songs, page 3, 1929, Long Brothers, printers, St John's, Newfoundland.

Also published in Burke's Ballads, p.44, c.1960, compiled by John White and archived at Memorial University of Newfoundland, Libraries, Centre For Newfoundland Studies - Digitized Books collection.


See more songs by Johnny Burke.

From Wikipedia:
Fogo - largest of the offshore islands of Newfoundland and Labrador, it lies off the northeast coast of Newfoundland, northwest of Musgrave Harbour across Hamilton Sound, just east of Change Islands. The island is about 25km (15.5mi) long and 14km (8.7mi) wide. The total area is 237.71km² (91.78sq mi). The island had a population of 2,706 people in the 2006 census, organized into eleven communities. The original settlement of the island took place in the 18th-century and the area remained isolated well into the 20th-century. The English and Irish descendants of the first inhabitants retained traces of their Elizabethan English and Old Irish dialects which can be heard on the Island today. The Island has many ancient folk customs brought from England and Ireland that are now disappearing.
Firkin - old English unit of volume. For beer and ale a firkin is equal to nine imperial gallons, seventy-two pints, or a quarter of a barrel (40.91481 litres). Butter and soap used to be sold by the firkin, too. In these cases it was a measure of weight, instead of volume: e.g., 56 lb (25.4 kg) and 64 lb (29.0 kg) respectively.

From the Dictionary of Newfoundland English:
Flipper - fore-limb of a seal, used to propel the animal in the water or on the ice; especially as prepared for eating.
Quintal - hundredweight (112 pounds); a measure of cod-fish caught by fishermen.
Sounds - air bladders, or hydrostatic organs, of a cod-fish, removed during splitting and salted as a delicacy.



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