#02597
Whisky On A Sunday (Glyn Hughes) MIDI, video
See also: Whiskey On A Sunday (Irish Rovers)
(Seth Davy) (Come Day, Go Day)
#697: YouTube video by threelegsoman
©2009 ~ Used with permission ~

midi1   alt: midi2

He sat on the corner of Bevington Bush,
Astride an old packing case;
And the dolls at the end of the plank went dancing,
As he crooned with a smile on his face:

La, la, la, la.... Come day, go day,
Wish in me heart for Sunday;
La, la, la, la.... Drinking buttermilk all the week,
And it's whisky on a Sunday.

His tired old hands drummed the wooden beam,
And the puppets they danced t' gear;
A far better show then you ever would see,
At the Pivvy or New Brighton Pier.

La, la, la, la.... Come day, go day,
Wish in me heart for Sunday;
La, la, la, la.... Drinking buttermilk all the week,
And it's whisky on a Sunday.

But in 1902, old Seth Davy died,
His song it was heard no more;
The three dancing dolls in a jowler-bin ended,
The plank went to mend a back door.

La, la, la, la.... Come day, go day,
Wish in me heart for Sunday;
La, la, la, la.... Drinking buttermilk all the week,
And it's whisky on a Sunday.

But on some stormy nights, down Scotty Road way,
With the wind blowing in from the sea,
You can still hear the song of old Seth Davy,
As he crooned to his dancing dolls three:

La, la, la, la.... Come day, go day,
Wish in me heart for Sunday;
La, la, la, la.... Drinking buttermilk all the week,
And it's whisky on a Sunday.
La, la, la, la.... Drinking buttermilk all the week,
And it's whisky on a Sunday.

####.... Glyn Hughes (c.1959) of Liverpool, England [1932-1972] ....####
This variant and the video above was arranged and performed by Tony Archibald from Port St Mary on the Isle of Man.

A very similar variant was published in a book for schools, Songs Of A Changing World by Jon Raven, 1972.

A similar variant was arranged and recorded as Seth Davey by The Spinners on a 45rpm single as side A, with All For Me Grog as side B, Fontane Records, United Kingdom, 1966).

Variants of this song have been recorded by many artists, including The Dubliners (1966), Danny Doyle (1968), The Irish Rovers (All Hung Up, 1968), and The Mersey Wreckers (Echoes From Liverpool, 2008).

A variant was also arranged and recorded by Sons of Erin of St John's, NL (Pleasant And Delightful, trk#2, c.1980, engineered by Clode Sound Studios, Stephenville, NL).


See more songs by Sons of Erin.

From Forest School Camps Organization UK:
Whisky on a Sunday, AKA Come Day, Go Day, AKA Seth Davy was written in the 1960s by Glyn Hughes. Hughes was born in Liverpool in 1932 and died there in 1972. During his brief life he had many occupations: journalist, short-story writer, bookseller's assistant, musician in a circus, film extra, hotel liftman and songwriter, to mention only a few. The song is about a well-known Jamaican street entertainer in Liverpool in the 1890s/1900s and has been recorded by among others The Dubliners, The Irish Rovers and Rolf Harris.

Notes by Matthew Edwards in the Mudcat.org:
Glyn Hughes was a folk singer in Liverpool in the late 50's and 60's who died quite young, and it seems that he wrote this song about 1959 after hearing stories about Seth Davy from older people who remembered seeing him. Glyn Hughes recorded the song for Fritz Spiegl about 1959, and amazingly, some years later, Fritz Spiegl discovered some old lantern slides of Liverpool scenes one of which featured a group of children watching a black man in a bowler hat making some wooden dolls dance on a plank. The scene can definitely be identified as being outside the Bevington House Hotel in Liverpool. All this information comes from the late Fritz Spiegl's Liverpool Street Songs and Broadside Ballads published by the Scouse Press as Liverpool Packet No 1.

The former Web site Liverpool Discovers noted:
Seth Davy - (died circa 1902) West Indian sailor, legendary puppeteer and street entertainer who inspired the 1960s folk song Whisky on a Sunday by Glynn Hughes. Bevington Bush in the opening line was a pub near Scotland Road and is cited as the source of Liverpool slang for a beer - a Bevvy.

From Liverpool Lyrics as known by Gerry Jones of Broad Green:
Seth Davy - a real person, he really existed, and he died a couple of years into the 20th-century. There was a street and a pub, both called "Bevington Bush" just north of Liverpool City Centre, and Seth Davy did do a "busking" act outside.

In his book Liverpool: Our City - Our Heritage, Freddie O'Connor tells us that in 1760, half a mile from Marybone ("St Patrick's Cross") along Bevington Bush Road was a hamlet named Bevington Bush which had an inn called simply the 'Bush', which became a favourite haunt for folk to travel 'out into the country', to the 'Bevy Inn' as it became fondly known. The Liverpool slang for 'bevvy' may have derived from this old inn.

The Liverpool Pictorial noted:
Bevington Bush was the name of a thickly wooded valley between Bevington Hill and Everton Hill. An inn on Bevington Hill was called 'The Bush'. With the opening of Scotland Road, the ancient Bevington Bush Road became a minor road amidst the massive slum district that would soon engulf it. As the district was built up it also lost its original name.



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