#02259
The Maid On The Shore O (Kenneth Peacock)
See also: The Maid On The Shore (Stan Rogers)
See also: The Maid On The Shore (Barry Taylor)

It was of a young maiden who lived all alone,
She lived all alone on the shore-o;
There was nothing she could find
for to comfort her mind
But to roam all alone on the shore, shore, shore,
But to roam all alone on the shore.

It was of a young captain who sailed the salt sea,
Let the winds blow high or blow low-o;
"I will die, I will die," this young captain did cry,
"If I can't get that maid from
the shore, shore, shore,
If I can't get that maid from the shore.

"I have lots of silver, I have lots of gold,
I have lots of costly ware-o;
I'll divide, I'll divide with my jolly ship's crew
If they'll row me that maid
from the shore, shore, shore,
If they'll row me that maid from the shore."

After long persuadance they got her on board,
Let the winds blow high or blow low-o;
Where he placed her a chair in his cabin below.
"Here's adieu to all sorrow and care, care, care,
Here's adieu to all sorrow and care."

She sot herself down in his cabin below,
Let the winds blow high or blow low-o;
Where she sang sweet, so neat and complete,
She sang captain and sailors asleep, sleep, sleep,
She sang captain and sailors asleep.

She robbed him of silver, she robbed him of gold,
She robbed him of costly ware-o;
And she stole his broadsword instead of an oar,
And she paddled her way
to the shore, shore, shore,
And she paddled away to the shore.

"My men must been crazy,
my men must been mad,
My men must been deep in despair-o,
For to let her go 'way with her beauty so gay,
And to paddle her way to the shore, shore, shore,
And to paddle her way to the shore."

"Your men was not crazy, your men was not mad,
Your men was not deep in despair-o;
I deluded your sailors as well as yourself,
I'm a maiden again on the shore, shore, shore,
I'm a maiden again on the shore."

####.... Variant of British broadside ballads, The Maid On The Shore, The Fair Maid By The Sea Shore, and The Sea Captain [Laws K27] American Balladry From British Broadsides (G Malcolm Laws, 1957). This fo'c's'le (forecastle) shanty or forebitter was first published as an 1859 entry in the journal from the whaling schooner, Ocean Rover, out of Nantucket, Massachusetts ....####
This variant was collected by Kenneth Peacock in 1958 from Mrs Thomas (Annie) Walters [1896-1986] of Rocky Harbour, NL, and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 1, pp.296-297, by The National Museum Of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

Kenneth Peacock noted that this fine old sea ballad may be regarded as a marine variant of Bromfield Hill (Child 43), one of the old pastourelles in which clever maidens managed to protect their innocence by various stratagems. Formerly they possessed many magical powers, but the only supernatural gift left to the maid on the shore is her ability to sing captain and sailors to sleep. Peacock also noted that Isaac Freeman Bennett [1896-1981] of St Paul's, NL, sang a six-verse version very similar to this. The only improvement in the wording would be the first line of verse seven: "Oh were my men drunk, or were my men mad?" and the corresponding answer at the beginning of verse eight.

A variant was also collected by Barry Taylor and published as The Maid On The Shore in his Great Canadian Tunebook.

A variant was recorded as The Maid On The Shore by Stan Rogers (For The Family, ©1996 Gadfly Records).


See more songs by Stan Rogers.

A variant was also collected by Elisabeth Bristol Greenleaf and Grace Yarrow Mansfield in 1929 from Mrs Thomas (Annie) Walters [1896-1986] of Rocky Harbour, NL, and published as #28, The Maiden Who Dwelt By The Shore (pp.63-64) in Ballads And Sea Songs Of Newfoundland, (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1933; and Folklore Associates, Hatboro, Pennsylvania, 1968).

A fo'c's'le (forecastle) shanty or forebitter was usually sung by resting sailors gathered about the forebitts, a structure near the bow where crew quarters and anchor chains were located.

GEST notes that the word 'sot' appears several times in the Dictionary Of Newfoundland English, usually within quotations which serve as examples of usage for defined words. The word itself is obscurely defined on page two of the Introduction to the Dictionary. It is used in this song as the past tense of the verb 'sit' spoken with a Newfoundland dialect.



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