#02159
On The Schooner John Joe (Kenneth Peacock)

Come all you young men who fishing do go,
Beware of George Farr in his schooner John Joe,
He weighed up the anchor, we struck up a tune,
Bound to Labrador on the fourteenth of June.
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

When we come to our breakfast 'tis soup made of fish,
When we come to our dinner it's the old dish,
When we come to our supper 'tis thin hard bread,
So I went to the cook for to push in his head.
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

"'Tis true I was never fed upon a grand dish,
Nor brought up on soup made out of fresh fish."
When George he came forward, began for to speak,
"If you stretch the cook sure I'll stretch you to sleep."
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

Those words were scarce spoken when just in a snap
Old George wheeled around and gave me a smart rap,
I squared off at once and there I did meet
Our old skipper George right fair in the teeth.
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

He raised his hands quick but then changed his mind,
With a grin on his face he slapped me behind.
"Make us a pork cake," old George he did jaw
To the cook in the fo'c'sle a-mixin' the dough.
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

We ate a bangbelly, we had sure enough,
We made a good meal of the fat pork and duff,
Old George he can jaw but I don't care a pin,
I'm eatin' pork cake and I'm sure it's no sin.
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

There was an old whaler come in from Bras d'Or,
Said Georgie, "I'll bring you what you never had before."
He went to the skipper, a grin in his teeth,
And he brought us some whale and he swore 'twas good meat.
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

"And if it's good meat you might eat it yourself,
For I do not want it you ugly old elf,
And after you eat it your plate you may lick,
May the devil turn your stomach and make you real sick!"
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

My wife she's at home too sad for to sing,
And now I'm near dyin' for the want of something,
If she were here I wouldn't refuse,
It's not for the sake of the time I would lose.
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

But now we're bound home and our wings they are spread,
And the cow-tails are flying all over our heads,
And walkin' the deck and the shaft it being soft
All the blocks they come tumblin' right down from aloft.
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

Oh, now we are home and the table is spread,
The children all flock to get their hard bread,
They got their own rounds and to dine it's soon gone,
And they drove from the table right every one.
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

And now to conclude and to finish my song,
I'm afraid now you've heard it you'll say it's too long,
Some of you good people might take it the wrong way,
By the skin on my bones it's the truth I do say!
And sing fall the diddle lair
rel fall lair rel I day.

####.... Tom Evans ....####
Collected by Kenneth Peacock in 1960 from Leonard Hulan [1881-1964] of Jeffrey's, NL, and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 1, pp.140-141, by the National Museum Of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

Kenneth Peacock noted that Leonard Hulan said this song was composed about 1890 by Tom Evans, an Englishman who settled in Newfoundland in the late nineteenth century.

From the Dictionary of Newfoundland English:
Bangbelly - pudding, cake or pancake, originally prepared by fishermen and men in the woods, made with flour, fat pork, etc, and boiled, baked or fried, now usually served as dessert.
Cow-tails - cirrus clouds or mare's tails; a cloud formation predicting strong winds.
Duff - pudding made of flour and water, sometimes with suet and raisins added, boiled in a cloth bag; cloth pudding. Figgy duff, stogger.



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