#02087
Trip To The North Pole (MacEdward Leach)

In the springtime of the year,
When the weather it was rainy,
I shipped on board of a lighter,
My name is Tom Cornelly.

Sing tiddy fol-loo, sing right fol-loo,
Sing tiddy fol loo fol-i-do.

Oh, to the Labrador we were bound,
And I was but a greenie,
The captain he would at me roar,
"I'll kill you, Tom Cornelly."

Sing tiddy fol-loo, sing right fol-loo,
Sing tiddy fol loo fol-i-do.

At last we reached that awful land,
Where the snow and ice was baking,
And the ducks they did all fly in flocks,
Which set our hearts a-shaking.

Sing tiddy fol-loo, sing right fol-loo,
Sing tiddy fol loo fol-i-do.

Oh, they landed us at American Point,
Oh, you might think it was easy,
For when we spit into the fire,
'Twould crack it was so greasy.

Sing tiddy fol-loo, sing right fol-loo,
Sing tiddy fol loo fol-i-do.

At last we started for the north,
Up in the Arctic Ocean,
Where they said the salmon was so thick,
The sea it had no motion.

Sing tiddy fol-loo, sing right fol-loo,
Sing tiddy fol loo fol-i-do.

At last we arrived to Ungava,
But it wasn't quite so hunky,
The very first thing boarded us
Was a great and big Husky.

Sing tiddy fol-loo, sing right fol-loo,
Sing tiddy fol loo fol-i-do.

This man he was both short and thick,
He had a wife and baby,
Then he was all covered with hair,
And you would swear he's crazy.

Sing tiddy fol-loo, sing right fol-loo,
Sing tiddy fol loo fol-i-do.

Oh, we beat up in another day,
And there we met more Huskies,
They bartered with the captain some,
I tell you he got rusties.

Sing tiddy fol-loo, sing right fol-loo,
Sing tiddy fol loo fol-i-do.

But if ever I get back again,
You'll hear tell of Ungava,
Where the salmon they run number one,
And the Huskies they're all starving.

Sing tiddy fol-loo, sing right fol-loo,
Sing tiddy fol loo fol-i-do.

####.... Authored by Tom Cornelly per Leach's lyrics. Traditional Newfoundland song ....####

Collected in 1951 from Tom Cornelly or Cornealy of St Shott's, NL, or Halifax, NS, and published in MacEdward Leach And The Songs Of Atlantic Canada © 2004 Memorial University of Newfoundland Folklore and Language Archive (MUNFLA).

GEST notes: Since Tom Cornelly's name is so similar to Tom Cornealy's, it is possible this song was collected from Tom Cornealy of Halifax, Halifax County, Nova Scotia, who Helen Creighton described as an informative old shellback (a sailor who has crossed the equator by boat) who claimed to have composed the marine ballad Captain Conrod in 1883, and also sang The Schooner Mary Anne and several shanties for her. This may also be true since no record of Tom Cornelly can be found in St Shott's.

From Genesis Maritime Terms and Dictionary:
Lighter - general name for a broad, flat-bottomed boat used in transporting cargo between a vessel and the shore. The term "lighter" refers to a short haul, generally in connection with loading and unloading operations of vessels in harbour.

From Wikipedia:
Ungava - peninsula in northernmost Quebec, bounded by Hudson Bay to the west, Hudson Strait to the north, and Ungava Bay to the east. The Ungava Peninsula is part of the Labrador Peninsula.

From the Dictionary of Newfoundland English:
Husky - coastal Eskimo or Inuit of Labrador. "Huskies" is a contraction of "Huskimos", the pronunciation given to the word by the English sailors of the trading vessels.
Rusty - young harp seal in a phase following 'white coat.' Second-year harps are 'rusties', or 'rusty jackets'. A 'rusty ranger' is a second-year seal with rounded spots that have not yet opened into the harp shape, a curious well-defined saddle of brown hair on the backs of all adult harp seals, which seems to become the outward sign of full tribal initiation when distinctly visible on the pelt. Until it is complete all these unmarked seals, when in the returning herds of the succeeding springs, are known to the sealers first as 'rusties' - and then, after a couple of years and until maturity, as 'bedlamers'.


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