#01633
The Irish Colleen (Collected by Kenneth Peacock) with lyrics

I went to a party consisting of four,
And as it was private we soon closed the door;
There was one girl from England and another from Wales,
And one that resided in Scotland's fair dales.
We sat down in friendship, we drank of the wine,
Each told of their country, I told them of mine;
The rose, leek,and thistle, unconquered, unseen,
But says I, "Here's a toast to the Irish Colleen."

Then here's to old Ireland, her sons and her daughters,
Here's to old Ireland, the shamrock I mean;
May the sun always shine on the round towers of Erin,
Here's a toast from the heart of an Irish colleen.

The Welsh girl stood up, gave a toast to the leek,
Saying, "I drink to my emblem each day of the week."
The Scots lassie stood up with the pride in her eye,
Saying, "Here's to the thistle no Scotsmen deny."
The English girl then gave a toast to the rose,
Saying, "Here's to old England, she can thrash all her foes."
But says I, "I won't willingly cause any pain,
I ask you to join in my toast once again."

Then here's to old Ireland, her sons and her daughters,
Here's to old Ireland, the shamrock I mean;
May the sun always shine on the round towers of Erin,
Here's a toast from the heart of an Irish colleen.

We don't hold for the traitors to martyr their cause,
All we want is justice and good honest laws,
And the man that's ashamed of the place where he came
Is no man at all, not worthy of name.
I own as a flower I'm fond of the rose,
The fairest of flowers in the garden that grows,
Though the flowers all resemble there's a vast gulf between
The rose, leek, and thistle, and the Irish colleen.

Then here's to old Ireland, her sons and her daughters,
Here's to old Ireland, the shamrock I mean;
May the sun always shine on the round towers of Erin,
Here's a toast from the heart of an Irish colleen.
####.... Variant of a British broadside ballad, The Irish Colleen, written and composed by W. C. Robey, performed by Lizzie Howard, and published by R. March and Co. (London) sometime between 1877 and 1884, and archived at the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, shelfmark: Firth b.28(10a/b) ....####
Collected in 1961 from Patrick W. Nash of Branch, NL, and Mike Kent of Cape Broyle, NL, by Kenneth Peacock and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 2, pp.366-368, by the National Museum of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

Kenneth Peacock noted that verse three is taken from the text of Mike Kent. Peacock was unable to find this song in the Irish collections at his disposal, but had no doubt that such a patriotic eulogy had not gone unnoticed by Irish anthologists.






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