#01628
The Girl I Left Behind (Kenneth Peacock)
(Version A)

Go down to: Version B.

It's of a wealthy squire who did live in this part,
He had one only daughter, and I had gained her heart;
She being noble-minded, tall, beautiful and fair,
With Columbia's fair daughter she really can compare.

I told her my intention, it was soon to cross the main,
Said I, "Will you be faithful till I return again?"
Big drops of tears came in her eyes, her bosom hove a sigh,
"Fair youth," said she, "fear not for me, my love can never die."

According to agreement I went on board my ship,
And near the town of Glasgow, we made a pleasant trip,
Where I found gold was plenty, and the girls were someway fine,
My love began to cool a bit for the girl I left behind.

We next set out from Dumfries town, that hospitable land,
Where handsome Jenny Ferguson, she took me by the hand,
Saying, "I have money plenty if love for me you'll find,
There are parents dear and other friends that you have left behind,
You never, if you marry me, can bear them in your mind."

To this I soon consented, I own it to my shame,
How can a man be happy when he knows himself to blame?
It is true I have money plenty, and a wife that's someways kind,
But still my pillow is haunted by the friends I left behind.

My father in his winding sheet, my mother she does appear,
The girl I love sitting by her side a-wipng off her tears,
For broken-hearted they all died but now too late I find,
For God had seen my cruelty for the girl I left behind.

Collected by Kenneth Peacock in 1952 from Mrs John (Amelia) Fogarty [1882-?] of Joe Batt's Arm, NL, and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 2, pp.449-450, by the National Museum of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

The Girl I Left Behind
(Version B)

'Twas of a wealthy captain who lived in our port,
He had one only daughter, and I had won her heart,
Her lips I kissed, her cheeks I pressed and her bosom soft and kind,
And I said, "Fair maid, weep not for me, I'll soon leave you behind."

I asked her if she would prove true while I sailed o'er the main,
I asked her if she would prove true till I returned again.
She promised me she would prove true till death would prove unkind,
So I kissed her and I parted from the girl I left behind.

Then as I roved out one evening to view a distant land,
I met young Janie Verdon and she offered me her hand,
Saying, "Money I have plenty, fine houses and fine land,
And if you'll agree and marry me it's all at your command."

Sure I agreed and married her, I own it to my shame,
How can a man live happy when he has himself to blame?
I know my gold is plentiful and my wife to me is kind,
But I'll never forget the bonny wee lass, the girl I left behind.

My father is in his winding sheet, my mother she did appear,
The girl I loved sat by her side a-wipng off her tears,
And now my song is ended but I'm not true in mind,
For my pillow still lies untended by the girl I left behind.

Collected by Kenneth Peacock in 1952 from Mrs John (Amelia) Fogarty [1882-?] of Joe Batt's Arm, NL, and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 2, pp.451-452, by the National Museum of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

####.... Variants of a 19th-century British broadside ballad, The Girl I Left Behind [Laws P1a] American Balladry From British Broadsides (G Malcolm Laws, 1957). Also variants of a 19th-century British broadside ballad, Girl I Left Behind, published by J O Bebbington (Manchester) and sold by J Beaumont (Leeds) and H Andrews (Leeds) sometime between 1855 and 1858, and archived at the Bodlein Library Broadside Ballads, shelfmark: Firth c.26(280) ....####

Kenneth Peacock noted that this English song goes back at least as far as the early 1800s when it appeared as a broadside.


line

Index Page
GEST Songs Of Newfoundland And Labrador



line

~ Copyright Info ~

~ Privacy Policy ~

Confirm Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Here