#01606
Blooming Mary Ann (Kenneth Peacock)
(Lovely Mary Ann)

I am a little sailor lad
that do go on the sea,
I am a jolly fisherman,
whatever I may be;
Oh, once I courted a pretty girl,
I'll gain her if I can,
And I dearly dote upon her,
she's my blooming Mary Ann.

The very first time I saw my love
sure it was to a spree,
The very first glimpse I got of her
I said she was for me;
As I went to the spree that night
a-courting we began,
And it was my first acquaintance
with blooming Mary Ann.

As I went to the spree that night
myself for to enjoy,
For singing and for dancing
like any other boy,
Where some danced reels,
some more danced jigs,
each girl unto her man,
But among them all danced none at all
like blooming Mary Ann.

Oh, when the spree was over
and homeward we did go,
And what shall follow after,
you shortly shall know;
"When shall we meet again," I said,
"when shall we meet again?"
"'Twill be on next Sunday evening,"
cried blooming Mary Ann.

Three days passed and Sunday came,
I thought it was high time
For to get ready and go see
that blooming girl of mine;
I washed my hands, likewise my face,
my clothes I did put on,
And 'twas down the street I went
to meet my blooming Mary Ann.

'Twas walking down and all around
and singing merrily,
Until I came to her father's cot,
the place where she should be;
Until I came to her father's cot,
the place where she did stand,
And 'twas there I was kind treated
by blooming Mary Ann.

Oh, up speaks her old father
and this to me did say,
"If you love each other
I suppose 'twill have to be;
I'll give you a little money
and a house and farm of land,
If you'll stay on shore forever more
with my daughter Mary Ann."

Oh, I being young in the world
as plainly you can see,
And to refuse that offer
what a foolish lad I'd be;
I thanked him for his money
and a house and farm of land,
And I fell into the arms
of his daughter Mary Ann.

Oh, now we are married,
boys, and evermore to be,
Her parents they do like me,
they do speak well of me;
Instead of plowing the ocean
I can plough unto my land,
And I bless the day I came from sea,
met blooming Mary Ann.

Come all you jolly sailor lads
that do go on the sea,
If ever you meet with such a chance
embrace it tenderly;
If ever you meet with such a chance
embrace it if you can,
And especially if it should be
like blooming Mary Ann.

####.... Author unknown. Traditional Newfoundland song ....####
Collected by Kenneth Peacock in 1959 from Joseph Bruce [1876-1969] of Searston, NL, and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 2, pp.505-506, by the National Museum of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

A variant was also collected by MacEdward Leach and published as #34, Lovely Mary Ann in Folk Ballads And Songs Of The Lower Labrador Coast by the National Museum of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

A variant was sung in 1951 by Cyril O'Brien [ca.1902-?] of Trepassey, NL, and published as Blooming Mary Ann in MacEdward Leach And The Songs Of Atlantic Canada © 2004 Memorial University of Newfoundland Folklore and Language Archive (MUNFLA).



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