#01433
Dixie's Isle (Kenneth Peacock)

The drums and fifes are beating,
I can no longer stay,
The drums and fifes are beating
And call me far away;
They call me down to New Orleans
For many a long mile,
To fight the southern soldiers
Way down on Dixie's Isle.

"Jimmy, lovely Jimmy,
May I go along with you?
I will cut off my yellow locks
And go to Orleans too."
"Your waist it is too slender, love,
Your figure is not the style,
And I'm afraid you would not answer,
Way down on Dixie's Isle.

"Our colonel gave us orders,
His orders did run so,
Our colonel gave us orders,
No women they should go;
The scorching sun of New Orleans
Your delicate figure would spoil,
Way down on the sandy deserts,
Way down on Dixie's soil."

My curse be to all wars
When fighting first began,
It robbed New York and Boston
Of many's a decent man;
It robbed women of their husbands dear,
Protectors of the soil,
The blood it flowed, stained the grass that growed
Way down on Dixie's Isle.

Now the war is over,
And home we will return,
Unto our wives and swethearts,
And those we left to mourn;
May the great God look down on us
And pity us every mile,
We'll go no more a-fighting
Way down on Dixie's Isle.

####.... Author unknown. Civil War adaptation of a 19th-century British broadside ballad, Banks Of The Nile [Laws N9] American Balladry From British Broadsides, p.206, G Malcolm Laws (1957). Also a variant of a British broadside ballad, Banks Of The Nile, published by J O Bebbington (Manchester) sometime between 1855 and 1858, and archived at the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, shelfmark: Harding B 11(158) ....####

Collected in 1952 from Thomas Sullivan [1875-?] of King's Cove, NL, by Kenneth Peacock and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 3, pp.996-997, by the National Museum of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.


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