#01322
Crab Song (MacEdward Leach)

Good morning, Mr Devil, morning, sir, he said,
Whack fol the didlle-o the diddle-i-day;
You've got a crab which you'll sell unto me,
To me all whack fol-de-diddle-i-dee.

I got a crab fish one, two, three,
Whack fol the didlle-o the diddle-i-day;
And the fattest of the three I will sell unto thee,
To thee all whack fol-de-diddle-i-dee.

Jack took the fattest by the backbone,
Whack fol the didlle-o the diddle-i-day;
Like a damn fool came swigging on the rum,
To me all whack fol-de-diddle-i-dee.

And when he got home for the want of a dish,
Whack fol the didlle-o the diddle-i-day;
Put him in the pot where the woman had to piss,
To me all whack fol-de-diddle-i-dee.

The woman got up and she did want,
Whack fol the didlle-o the diddle-i-day;
Crab fish caught on by the you-know-what,
To me all whack fol-de-diddle-i-dee.

Old man, old man, now do you come hither,
Whack fol the didlle-o the diddle-i-day;
Devil's in the pisspot tearing up your lover,
To me all whack fol-de-diddle-i-dee.

The man came peeping, as I suppose,
Whack fol the didlle-o the diddle-i-day;
Crab with his other claw caught him by the nose,
To me all whack fol-de-diddle-i-dee.

Run, boys, run get the looking glass,
Whack fol the didlle-o the diddle-i-day;
See your daddy's nose stuck up mommy's ass,
To me all whack fol-de-diddle-i-dee.

One got the poker, other got the stick,
Whack fol the didlle-o the diddle-i-day;
More they beat the crab fish, tighter held his grip,
To me all whack fol-de-diddle-i-dee.

####.... Variant of The Sea Crab, one of the oldest known traditional English language ballads (ca.1620) published in the Percy Folio ....####

Sung in 1950 by Francis (Ernest) Poole [1881-?] of Cape Ray, NL, and published in MacEdward Leach And The Songs Of Atlantic Canada © 2004 Memorial University of Newfoundland Folklore and Language Archive (MUNFLA).

From Encyclopedia Britannica: Thomas Percy - [1729-1811] English antiquarian and bishop whose collection of ballads, Reliques Of Ancient English Poetry (1765), awakened widespread interest in English and Scottish traditional songs. The basis of Percy's collection was a tattered 15th-century manuscript of ballads (known as the Percy Folio) found in the house of a friend when it was about to be used to light a fire. To this nucleus Percy added many other ballads, songs, and romances, supplied by his friends who, at his request, rummaged in libraries, attics, and warehouses for old manuscripts. Publication of the Reliques inaugurated the ballad revival, a flood of collections of ancient songs, that proved a source of inspiration to the Romantic poets.


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