#01137
Erin's Green Shore (Kenneth Peacock) videos
Jump down to Variant B

#1351: YouTube video by quickaccent2006
©2010 ~ Used with permission ~

~ Variant A (Sung by Mrs John Fogarty) ~

One evening so late had I rambled
By the banks of a clear purling stream,
I sat down on a bed of primroses,
And so gently fell into a dream.

I dreamt I beheld a fair female.
"My jewel, come tell me your name,
For I know in this country you're a stranger,
Or I would not have asked you the same."

She resembled the goddess of liberty,
And green was the mantle she wore,
Bound 'round with the shamrocks and roses,
That grew along Erin's green shore.

"I'm a daughter of Daniel O'Connell,
From England I lately came o'er;
I've come for to waken my brother,
That slumbers on Erin's green shore.

"I know you're a true son of Erin,
My secrets to you I'll unfold;
I am here in the midst of all danger,
Not knowing my friend from my foe."

She resembled the goddess of liberty,
And freedom the mantle she wore,
Bound 'round with the shamrocks and roses,
That grew along Erin's green shore.

Her eyes were like sparkling diamonds,
Or the stars of a clear frosty night;
And her cheeks like two blooming roses,
And her teeth of the ivory so white.

In transports of joy I awakened,
And found it was only a dream;
My beautiful damsel had fled me,
And I long to be slumbering again.

May the great God of heaven shine on her,
For I know I shall see her no more;
May the great God of glory shine on her,
As she strays along Erin's green shore.

Collected by Kenneth Peacock in 1952 from Mrs John (Amelia) Fogarty [1882-?] of Joe Batt's Arm, NL, and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 2, pp.362-363, by The National Museum Of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

~ Variant B (Sung by Joshua Osbourne) ~

One evening so late as I rambled
By the banks of a clear purling stream,
I lay down on a bed of green mosses
And quickly fell into a dream;
I dreamed I beheld a fair damsel,
Her equal I ne'er saw before,
And she sighed for the woes of her country
As she strolled along Erin's green shore.

I quickly addressed this fair damsel:
"My jewel, come tell me your name,
For I know to this place you're a stranger
And will not advise you the same."
"I'm the daughter of [Daniel] O'Connell,
From England I lately sailed o'er,
I came here to waken my brother
Who slumbers along Erin's green shore."

Her eyes were like two sparkling diamonds
Or the stars of a cold frosty night,
Her cheeks were like two blooming roses,
Her teeth were of ivory white,
She resembled the goddess of liberty
And green was the mantle she wore,
Decked out with shamrocks and primroses
That grow along Erin's green shore.

Transported with joy I awoke then
And found it was only a dream,
For to see this young damsel beside me
I longed for to slumber again.
May the heavens above be her guardian,
I know I shall see her no more,
May the sunbeams of glory shine on her
As she strolls along Erin's green shore.

Collected by Kenneth Peacock in 1960 from Joshua Osbourne [c1903-?] of Seal Cove, White Bay, NL, and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 2, pp.364-365, by The National Museum Of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

####.... Both of the above songs are variants of an early 19th-century British broadside ballad [Laws Q27] G Malcolm Laws, American Balladry From British Broadsides (1957). Also a variant of a British broadside ballad, Erin's Green Shore, published by G Walker (Durham) sometime between 1797 and 1834, and archived at the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, shelfmark: Harding B 11(1085) ....####
A variant was also published as #142 in Ballads And Sea Songs Of Newfoundland by Elisabeth Bristol Greenleaf and Grace Yarrow Mansfield (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Masachusetts, 1933; Folklore Associates, Hatboro, Pennsylvania, 1968.)

A variant was collected and published in Collier's, Newfoundland, by M P Ryan on pages 5 and 6 of his 1957 book Ryan's Favourites: Old Songs Of Newfoundland.

Kenneth Peacock noted that this Irish eulogy has appeared in many collections and broadsides in both Ireland and America. It survives in oral tradition in the Maritimes and in many parts of the United States.

Notes from the Barrier Breakers section of the Yale Tangled Roots project:
Daniel O'Connell [1775-1847] was called the "Liberator of Ireland" and at times the "Uncrowned King of Ireland". He was instrumental in gaining political rights for Irish Catholics from the British, and was elected to Parliament in 1828 even though, as a Catholic, he could not participate in its deliberations. He helped gain Catholic emancipation in 1829. Speaking in the United States, O'Connell encouraged Irish Americans to join the abolition cause. In his final years his concern was the Great Famine which engulfed Ireland and he died during this famine.

The video above features a recording of a variant by Harry Hibbs (A Fifth Of Harry Hibbs, trk#4, 1971, Arc Sound Ltd, Toronto, Ontario. In 2002 a digitally remastered CD was released by Unidisc Studios, Montreal, Quebec, by Robert Matichak).


See more songs by Harry Hibbs.

The video below features a live performance of a variant by John Tobias Pearson [b.1941] of Petite Forte and Southeast Bight, Placentia Bay West, NL, at the 2013 Burin Peninsula Festival of Folk Song and Dance.

#2432: YouTube video by Con Fitzpatrick
©2015 ~ Used with permission ~


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