Cape Breton Lullaby (Ryan's Fancy) MIDI, video
#666: YouTube video by oldirishladdie ©2009
~ Used with permission ~

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Driftwood is burning blue, wild walk the wall shadows,
Night winds go riding by, riding by the lochie meadows.
On to the ring of day flows Mira's stream, singing:
Caidil gu lo, laddie, lo, laddie, sleep the stars away.

Far on Beinn Bhreagh's side wander the lost lambies.
Here, there and everywhere, everywhere their troubled mammies
Find them and fold them deep, fold them to sleep, singing:
Caidil gu lo, laddie, lo, laddie, sleep the dark away.

Daddy is on the bay, he'll keep the pot brewing,
Keep all from tumbling down, tumbling down to rack and ruin;
Pray, Mary, send him home safe from the foam, singing:
Caidil gu lo, laddie, lo, laddie, sleep the night away.

####.... Kenneth Leslie [1892-1974] © R Dickson, 530 King St, Shawville, Quebec, Canada ....####
This variant was arranged and recorded by Ryan's Fancy (Looking Back, trk#12, 1972, Audat Records, Oshawa, Ontario).

See more songs by Ryan's Fancy.

From Wikipedia:
Beinn Bhreagh (generally pronounced ban vreeah) - name of the former estate of Dr. Alexander Graham Bell, in Victoria County, Nova Scotia, Canada. It refers to a peninsula jutting into Cape Breton Island's scenic Bras d'Or Lake approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) southeast of the village of Baddeck, forming the southeastern shore of Baddeck Bay. The peninsula was known to the Mi'kmaq as Megwatpatek, roughly translated to Red Head due to the reddish sandstone rocks at the tip of the peninsula. The name Beinn Bhreagh - meaning Beautiful Mountain in Scottish Gaelic - is thought to have been given to the peninsula by Dr. Bell, who purchased approximately 242.8 hectares (600 acres) to form the estate in the late 1880s.
In July 2005, the Nova Scotia Civic Address Project review changed the status of Beinn Bhreagh from a generic locality to a community
Kenneth Leslie [1892-1974] - Canadian poet and songwriter, and an influential political activist in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s. Born in Pictou, Nova Scotia, his father was a shipping magnate who became a member of the Quebec legislature in 1905, but drowned that same year when one of his ships, Lunenberg, sank in a storm. Leslie was raised by his mother, learning to play the violin and piano, and singing and writing poetry. He was a child prodigy, attending Dalhousie University in Halifax at age 14. Later he was educated at Colgate Theological Seminary for a year; the University of Nebraska, where he received his M A; and Harvard, where he studied under idealist Josiah Royce but did not receive a PhD.

Caidil gu lo - title of a fiddle tune in the Captain Simon Fraser [1773-1852] Collection (The Airs And Melodies Peculiar To The Highlands Of Scotland And The Isles, 1816). One translation given to this Scottish Gaelic phrase is Sleep till morning.

Sound recording AFS 03301 A02-A03, dated Sept. 18, 1937, is filed in the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress as Caidil go lo (Sleep till morning) sung by John H Matheson, and contributed by recordist Sidney Robertson Cowell, Duluth, Minn, with the comment: "Lullaby for a child whose father is off to the Battle of Culloden."

From Wikipedia:
The Battle of Culloden (Scottish Gaelic: Blàr Chùil Lodair) - final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart fought loyalist troops commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands.


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