#00981
Sam Jones (Richard Thompson) video
#295: YouTube video by Jim Abbott ©2013
~ Used with permission ~

Me name is Sam Jones and it's bones me occupation,
Chuck your old hocks out for my consideration;
Thirty years a bone man up and down the nation,
Sam Jones deliver them bones.

I've been among the shamrock
and I've been among the thistle,
I like it all picked over, clean as a whistle;
No sign of meat on, no sign of gristle,
Sam Jones deliver them bones.

I've seen battlefields white with human ivory,
Noble dukes and princes stripped of flesh and finery;
When the crows have done their job,
They say that's the time for me,
Sam Jones deliver them bones.

And I even dream of bones when I'm lying very ill,
Rooms full of skeletons a-dancing the quadrille;
Rows and rows of skulls singing Blueberry Hill,
Sam Jones deliver them bones.

And if you're unburied, the likes of me will find you,
You're no good to worms,
but you might become the finest glue;
We'll grind you up and spread you out as fertiliser, too,
Sam Jones deliver them bones.

And I've got a lorry, it's me own boneshaker,
Where there's old knuckle joints I'll be the undertaker;
I'll be calling 'round just like the butcher and the baker,
Sam Jones deliver them bones.

Me name is Sam Jones and it's bones me occupation,
Chuck your old hocks out for my consideration;
Thirty years a bone man, up and down the nation,
Sam Jones deliver them bones.
Oh, Sam Jones deliver them bones.
Sam Jones deliver them bones.

####.... Richard Thompson ....####
Recorded in 1996 by British singer-songwriter Richard Thompson on his eighth studio album You? Me? Us?, Disc #2 - Nude, trk#7, Beeswing Music, Capitol, The Sound Factory, Los Angeles, produced by Mitchell Froom, Tchad Blake.

From Wikipedia
Rag-And-Bone Man - collector of unwanted household items who sells them to merchants. Traditionally this was a task performed on foot, with the scavenged materials (which included rags, bones and various metals) kept in a small bag slung over the shoulder. Some wealthier rag-and-bone men used a cart, sometimes pulled by horse or pony. 19th-century rag-and-bone men typically lived in penury, surviving on the proceeds of what they collected each day. Conditions improved following the Second World War, but the trade declined during the latter half of the 20th-century. Lately, however, due in part to the soaring price of scrap metal, rag-and-bone men can once again be seen at work.



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