#00916
Demasduit Dream (Great Big Sea) video
#1638: YouTube video by gdgest
©2011 ~ Used with permission ~

I dreamt I saw a woman,
standing by a strand,
Waiting for her people to
come in from the land;
Waiting there for seven days,
she built a fire in the sand,
Waiting for her people to
come in from the land.

She had the look of a refugee
hiding in her eyes,
And when I tried to talk to her,
she answered with a cry;
And pointed to the water
out beyond the harbour line,
Where a thousand ships lay waiting,
they lay waiting for my sign.

But I remember days of sunlight,
with my father by my side,
And the children ran before us,
like the foam upon the tide.

We ran like frightened partridge,
when the strangers came to talk,
Bringing sickness 'round them
and the thunder in their walk;
We ran into the valleys
and we ran into the hills,
The young they ran before us,
driven by a stranger's will.

I remember days of sunlight,
with my father by my side,
And the children ran before us,
like the foam upon the tide.

I'm waiting by the land wash
with the giant standing near,
I see them coming always,
of children in their fear;
I'm waiting on my blanket,
and the giant waits with me,
And I will wait here always,
as they fill the endless sea.

I remember days of sunlight,
with my father by my side,
And the children ran before us,
like the foam upon the tide.

I remember days of sunlight,
with my father by my side,
And the children ran before us,
like the foam upon the tide.

I remember days of sunlight,
and I remember children;
And I remember days of sunlight,
and I remember ... I remember ... I remember ...

####.... Bob Hallett of Great Big Sea ....####
Recorded by Great Big Sea (Turn, trk#4, 1999, Sire Records, New York, NY, produced by Steve Berlin and Great Big Sea and recorded at First City Productions, St John's, NL).

See more songs by Great Big Sea.

Notes from Wikipedia:

Demasduit - When Newfoundland was discovered, no one really knew how many Beothuks lived there. 2,000 is probably a fair estimate. By 1768, only 400 were left, and by 1829, they were extinct. Demasduit [ca. 1796-1820] was one of the last of the Beothuk Indians. She was the wife of the last Beothuk chief, Nonosbawsut. She was captured in 1819 by John Payton, Jr, who was under orders to capture a Beothuk woman to use as an interpreter. He surprised Nonosbawsut's wife who was carrying her baby. She tried to get away but was too ill to run. Nonosbawsut tried to save her but was shot dead by Payton. Demasduit was captured and renamed Mary March (because she was captured in March). She was taken away and later promised that she would be let go, but she died of influenza at Ship Cove, Bay of Exploits on January 8, 1820, before she could return to her village.

Shanawdithit - (ca. 1801-1829), also known as Shawnadithititis, Shawnawdithit, Nancy April and Nancy Shanawdithit, was the last known living member of the Beothuk people of Newfoundland. She was the niece of Demasduit and was also remembered for drawings she made towards the end of her life. Shawnawdithit was in her late twenties when she died of tuberculosis in St John's on June 6, 1829.



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