#00818
Crockery Ware (Kenneth Peacock)

In Bristol did a merchant dwell,
He courted a girl and he loved her well,
And all he craved in his delight,
It was to lay with her one night.
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe,
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe.

As this fair maid on her bed did lay,
A-thinking on the trick on him she'd play,
And in his way she placed a chair,
And on the chair put crockery ware.
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe,
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe.

As this young man come in the dark,
A-looking for his old sweetheart,
He hit his toe against the chair,
And upset all the crockery ware.
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe,
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe.

The old woman ran downstairs in a fright,
And straightways callèd for a light.
She said, "You villain, what brought you here,
A-breaking all of my crockery ware?"
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe,
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe.

He said, "Old woman don't speak so cross,
I missed my way, I'm feared I'm lost,
I missed my way, I do declare,
I broke me shin on your crockery ware."
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe,
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe.

As this fair maid on her bed she lay,
A-laughing at the trick on him she'd played,
She said, "Young man, don't speak so queer,
Now pay my mother for the crockery ware."
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe,
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe.

The police were sent for right away,
And sure enough I had to pay
A dollar for a broken chair,
And a-one pound ten for the crockery ware.
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe,
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe.

Come all you rakes and rambling sports
That goes a-courting in the dark,
Don't hit your toes against a chair,
Or else you'll suffer for the crockery ware.
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe,
     To me rye whack fall the diddle I gee woe.

####.... Author unknown. Variant of a British broadside ballad, Crockery Ware archived without a publisher's name or date at the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, shelfmark: Harding B 28(37) and Harding B 28(133) ....####
This variant was collected in 1958 from Everett Bennett of St Paul's, NL, by Kenneth Peacock and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 1, pp.257-258, by The National Museum of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

A much shorter variant was a favorite often sung by Bill Pomeroy of Merasheen, NL, and was published for the 1980 Merasheen Reunion in Placentia Bay, NL, by Loyola Pomroy and William (Bill) Wilson Jr [1931-1993] of Meerasheen, Placentia Bay, NL.

A variant was arranged and recorded by Jim Payne and Fergus O'Byrne (How Good Is Me Life ©2007 SingSong Inc, St John's, NL).

Note: Crockery ware is another term for a chamber pot.



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