#00741
Herzogin Cecilie (William Pint and Felicia Dale)

Sailing down the Baltic where the wreck mark buoys peal,
Cruising down the Channel where the steamers never yield;
Beating through the Biscay where the crew they get no meals,
She's the mighty sailing ship, the Herzogin Cecilie!

The Herzogin Cecilie, the Herzogin Cecilie,
There goes the mighty sailing ship, the Herzogin Cecilie!

Tacking in the Tasman Sea where the winds upon her steal,
Rolling in the doldrums where the slightest wind she'll feel;
Roaring down the Forties with her rigging taut as steel,
There goes the mighty sailing ship, the Herzogin Cecilie!

The Herzogin Cecilie, the Herzogin Cecilie,
There goes the mighty sailing ship, the Herzogin Cecilie!

Coming down from Labrador with a load of pine and deal,
Off Tierra Del Fuego where the albatrosses wheel;
Running eastward for the Horn, hear her rigging squeal,
She is the mighty sailing ship, the Herzogin Cecilie!

The Herzogin Cecilie, the Herzogin Cecilie,
She is the mighty sailing ship, the Herzogin Cecilie!

She's the greyhound of the ocean, the fastest in her field,
But she's run upon the Bolt Head in the mist to test her steel;
She's hard aground on the rocks that have broken her keel,
She was the mighty sailing ship, the Herzogin Cecilie!

The Herzogin Cecilie, the Herzogin Cecilie,
She was the mighty sailing ship, the Herzogin Cecilie!

####.... Ken Stephens. Arranged by William Pint and Felicia Dale ....####
Recorded by Ken Stephens (Shipmates, trk#16) and (Seawheels, trk#2).

Recorded by Tom Lewis, William Pint and Felicia Dale (Making Waves, trk#5, OMB Studios, Port Orchard, Washington) ©1992 William Pint - Tom Lewis; performing rights administered by SOCAN. All rights reserved

From Wikipedia:
Herzogin Cecilie - German four-mast barque (windjammer), named after German Crown Princess Duchess Cecilie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin [1886-1954], spouse of Crown Prince Wilhelm of Prussia [1882-1951] (Herzogin being German for Duchess). Built in 1902, she was one of the fastest windjammers ever built. On 25 April 1936, she grounded on Ham Stone Rock and drifted onto the cliffs of Bolt Head on the south Devon coast. After parts of the cargo were unloaded, she was floating again, only to be towed in June 1936 to Starhole (Starehole) Bay at the mouth of the nearby Kingsbridge Estuary near Salcombe, and beached there. On 18 January 1939, the ship capsized and sank. The remains of the ship sit at a depth of 7 metres at 50o12.82'N 3o47.02'W.

From the Dictionary of Newfoundland English:
Deal (dale) - the wood of red pine (Pinus resinoso); a wide, easy to saw, softwood plank 38-100 mm (~1½-4") thick and over 175 mm (~7") wide.



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