#00221
Goodbye Johnny Dear (Carol Brothers) video
#1597: YouTube video by IrishMusicCountry ©2010
~ Used with permission ~

Just twenty years ago today, I held my mother's hand,
As she kissed and blessed her only son, going to a foreign land;
The neighbours took me from her breast and told her I must go,
But I could hear my mother's words though they were faint and low.

Goodbye, Johnny dear, when you're far away,
Don't forget your dear old mother far across the sea;
Write a letter now and then and send her all you can,
And don't forget where e'er you roam that you're an Irishman.

I sailed away from Queenstown, that is the Cove of Cork,
A very pleasant voyage we had and soon were in New York;
My friends came to meet me there and work I got next day,
But through all this hospitality I could hear my mother say.

Goodbye, Johnny dear, when you're far away,
Don't forget your dear old mother far across the sea;
Write a letter now and then and send her all you can,
And don't forget where e'er you roam that you're an Irishman.

One day a letter came to me, it came from Ireland,
The postmark showed it came from home, it was not my mother's hand;
'Twas father who had wrote to say that she had passed away,
And just as if from Heaven above I could hear my mother say.

Goodbye, Johnny dear, when you're far away,
Don't forget your dear old mother far across the sea;
Write a letter now and then and send her all you can,
And don't forget where e'er you roam that you're an Irishman.

####.... Johnny Patterson [1840-1889], Irish singer, songwriter, and circus entertainer ...####
After he was offered a contract in the United States in 1876, the Irish singer, songwriter, and circus entertainer, Johnny Patterson [1840-1889] became one of most famous and highest paid entertainers at the time. Back in Ireland, his political opinions in a song about Protestants and Catholics living peacefully together caused a fight at one performance. Patterson was hit on the head with an iron bar and kicked. He died from his injuries at Tralee.

This variant was recorded by soprano Carol Brothers, who starred on the CBC Television program All Around The Circle, a half-hour musical variety series (1967-1979) produced in St John's and occasionally other parts of Newfoundland (When Irish Eyes Are Smiling, trk#3, 1969, Paragon Records, Toronto, Ontario).

The video above features a recording of a variant by Dan The Street Singer from Louisburgh, County Mayo, Ireland (cassette: Among My Souvenirs, side#1, trk#5, Rainbow Records).

Excerpted from a feature article by Tyrone country singer Gene Stuart published September 7, 2006, in The Mirror (London, England):
During the 1980s, Dan the Street Singer was a regular guest on the Late Late Show and other television programmes on both sides of the Irish Sea. His real name was Basil Morahan and he came from Louisburgh, County Mayo. He died in the summer of 1998 at the age of 68. A man of extraordinary talent, he was a secondary school teacher in Westport CBS (Cell Broadcast Service) for many years. A gifted writer, he published a major book entitled Burning Truths in which he campaigned for the right of priests to marry. But it was as Dan the Street Singer that he became something of a countrywide institution. He was a regular on the streets of Tralee during the annual Rose Festival for many years and also on the promenade in Salthill, delighting locals and visitors alike as he pulled his cart behind him and performed the much-loved ballads of other days. His fame saw him emerge as one of Ireland's foremost cabaret attractions and he enjoyed huge popularity all around the country but especially in Derry and parts of Ulster where he gained wide acceptance from all sides of the community. As Dan the Street Singer, he recorded a number of albums and became a very good friend of Tyrone country singer, Gene Stuart. Wherever he went, he left an impression. Dan was truly a special entertainer and a very special person.



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