#00085
She's Like The Swallow (Peacock) MIDIs, videos
Variant A

Click to jump down to Variant B

sheet music

#1347: YouTube video by oldirishladdie ©2010
~ Used with permission ~

midi file   alt: midi file

midi file   alt: midi file

She's like the swallow that flies so high,
She's like the river that never runs dry;
She's like the sunshine on the lee shore,
She loves her love, but she'll love no more.

'Twas down in the meadow this fair bent,
A-picking the primrose just as she went;
The more she picked and the more she pulled,
Until she gathered her apron full.

She climbed on yonder hill above,
To give a rose unto her love;
She gave him one, she gave him three,
She gave her heart in company.

And as they sat on yonder hill,
His heart grew hard, so harder still;
He has two hearts instead of one,
She says, "Young man, what have you done?

When I carried my apron low,
My love followed me through frost and snow;
But now my apron is to my chin,
My love passes by and won't call in."

"How foolish, foolish you must be,
To think I love no one but thee;
The world's not made for one alone,
I take delight in everyone."

She took her roses and made a bed,
A stony pillow for her head;
She lay her down, no more did say,
Just let her roses fade away.

She's like the swallow that flies so high,
She's like the river that never runs dry;
She's like the sunshine on the lee shore,
She lost her love and she'll love no more.

####.... Author unknown. Traditional Newfoundland ballad ....####
Collected in 1959 from Mrs Charlotte Decker of Parson's Pond by Kenneth Peacock and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 3, pp.711-712 by The National Museum Of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

The video above features a recording of a variant by Gordon Pinsent (Roots, trk#3, 1968, Arc Sound Ltd, Recorded by Bay Studios, Toronto, Ontario, with direction and musical arrangements by Richard Gael and Patrick II).

The video below features a recording of a variant, She's Like A Swallow, by Cara Dillon [b.1975] from Dungiven, County Derry, Northern Ireland (Cara Dillon, trk#10, 2001, Rough Trade Records, London, UK).

She's Like A Swallow (Kenneth Peacock) video
Variant B
#400: YouTube video by pearlgemini ©2008
~ Used with permission ~

She's like a swallow that flies so high,
She's like the river that never runs dry;
She's like the sun shines on the lee shore,
She lost her love and she'll love no more.

Out in the meadow this fair went,
Picking those flowers just as she went;
The more she picked and the more she pulled,
Until she gathered her apron full.

There is a man on yonder hill,
He has a heart hard as steel;
He has two hearts instead of one,
She says, "Young man, what have you done?"

"How foolish, how foolish this girl must be,
To think I love no other but she;
The world's not made for one alone,
I take delight in everyone."

Out of those flowers she made a bed,
A stony pillow for her head;
And there she lay and never spoke,
Until this poor girl's heart was broke.

She's like a swallow that flies so high,
She's like the river that never runs dry;
She's like the sun shines on the lee shore,
She lost her love and she'll love no more.

####.... Author unknown. Original Newfoundland ballad ....####
Collected in 1959 from Mrs Wallace Kinslow of Isle aux Morts by Kenneth Peacock and published in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 3, pp.713-714 by The National Museum Of Canada (1965) Crown Copyrights Reserved.

A variant consisting of only 4-1/2 verses was also collected in 1930 from John Hunt of Dunville, Placentia Bay, NL, by Maud Karpeles [1885-1976] and published in Folk Songs From Newfoundland, p.243, Faber & Faber, London, 1971.

Kenneth Peacock noted that ever since Maud Karpeles collected a tantalizing fragment of this lyric ballad in Newfoundland in 1930 scholars and singers alike have been fascinated by its elusiveness and beauty. In variant B Mrs Kinslow used the title verse once or twice during the song as a sort of chorus, but Peacock placed it just at the beginning and end. Peacock also took Verse 5 of variant A from She Died In Love to further heighten the symbolism of the apron. He noted that the apron is often used as a symbol of pregnancy, though in this case just its position is sufficient to convey the before-and-after attitude of the young man. Meadows, gardens, and flowers in general are often used as fertility symbols, and Peacock could think of no other lyric where the rose symbolism had been used so exquisitely and with such persistent emotional logic, right to the bitter end.



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