What you need to know about NALED (Dibrom)

Fact Sheet on NALED by No Spray Coalition

Brevard: Mosquito Control Pesticides

Encephalitis Increase Linked to Pesticide Use

Fact Sheet on NALED by NCAP

Fact Sheet on NALED by Colorado Fight the Bite




EPA: Documents for Naled

EPA: Summary for Naled




Red Bullet Pesticides and Cancer




EPA: Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings 5th Edition (1999)




Exposed: Signs, symptoms & EMS management of nerve-agent poisoning




Naled Used By:

East Baton Rouge Mosquito Abatement

Red Bullet Mosquito Control in St. Tammany Parish




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The Germans invented nerve agents during World War II

Naled is a nerve agent

Must bear the signal words "Danger-Poison"



Naled (trade name Dibrom) is an organophosphate with many of the same characteristics and concerns as malathion. Naled can cause cholinesterase inhibition in humans: that is, it can over stimulate the nervous system causing nausea, dizziness, confusion, and at high exposures, can cause respiratory paralysis and death. One of the byproducts of degradation of Naled is dichlorvos, another registered organophosphate. This compound is of toxicological concern.

Researchers at the Cornell University Program on Breast Cancer and Environmental Risk Factors in New York State review several studies on dichlorvos. In one study, female mice that were fed high doses of dichlorvos over a long period of time had a higher frequency of stomach cancers than untreated mice. High doses of dichlorvos fed over two years caused an increase in the number of male rats that had pancreatic tumors and leukemia. A higher number of leukemia cases were reported in one study among male farmers who used dichlorvos for more than ten days per year, compared to those who had not used dichlorvos. A higher number of childhood brain cancer cases were reported among families that used dichlorvos than among families that did not.

The pesticide trichlorfon is a common ingredient in the mosquito pesticide dibrom (naled). In one study, trichlorfon was found to cause a "severe reduction" in brain weight (and shape) in test animals exposed. The timing of exposure to the developing offspring appeared to be the key factor in determining neurological damage (known as the "critical brain growth period"). It occurred when the chemical was administered between 40-50 days gestation for the guinea pig, which scientists say, correlates with the brain growth spurt period for the animal.

Russian scientists studied the growth rates of fish called Bream (Abramis brama) after exposure to the dibrom/naled contaminant dichlorvos. The first major effect detected was a significant reduction in the growth rates of the fish. Researchers believe it may be due to the subtle neurotoxin actions of the pesticide and its effects upon the areas of the brain involved in feeding or food search mechanisms.

Naled is characterized as very highly toxic to bees and aquatic invertebrates. It is moderately to highly toxic to fish and slightly toxic to upland game birds and waterfowl. There is potential for chronic risk from Naled to estuarine invertebrates.

Impact of naled (Dibrom 14) on the mosquito vectors of eastern equine encephalitis virus This study reports on analyses of 11 years (1984-94) of mosquito collection data from Cicero and Toad Harbor swamps in relation to applications of naled. Naled applications were successful in achieving short-term reductions in mosquito abundance. However, despite repetitive applications, populations of the primary vector of EEE virus, Cs. melanura, have increased 15-fold at Cicero Swamp. Preventive applications had no noticeable impact on the enzootic amplification of EEE virus, and isolations of virus following preventive applications have resulted in additional spraying. The possibility that applications of naled contributed to increased populations of Cs. melanura discredits the rationale that preventive applications of naled reduce the risk of EEE. For more information, click here


Naled is the most toxic of the mosquito adulticides and is the only mosquito adulticide in class 1, the highest toxicity, with the signal word "Danger".

Naled is the only one that states in its label: inhaling can be FATAL.

Naled is corrosive to the skin and eyes and may cause permanent damage.

Once in the bloodstream, Naled may cross the placenta.
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